7/1/20

"THE GOSPEL OF MATTHEW" Building To Withstand The Storms (7:24-27)

"THE GOSPEL OF MATTHEW"

Building To Withstand The Storms (7:24-27)
INTRODUCTION 1. 1998 was quite a year for natural disasters in the state of Florida... a. There were killer tornadoes, devastating fires, destructive hurricanes b. Impacting the lives of many people 2. Such disasters proved to reveal much about contractors... a. We learned that some builders were unscrupulous b. Failing to build according to code, many homes and buildings were destroyed 3. Jesus made a parallel between storms and buildings at the end of His sermon - Mt 7:24-27 a. As He sought to encourage people to act upon His sayings b. Contrasting the difference between those who were doers and not just listeners 4. In this lesson, I wish to address the following questions... a. What do the "houses" of the wise and foolish builders represent? b. What "storms" is Jesus talking about? c. How can we "build" so as to be able to withstand the storms? [Let's begin by identifying the "houses"; I suggest that...] I. THE HOUSES REPRESENT OUR LIVES A. EACH OF US IS BUILDING A "LIFE"... 1. A life that will eventually face the vicissitudes of life 2. A life that will respond to the many ups and downs that come our way B. WE ARE BUILDING THESE "LIVES" UPON A FOUNDATION... 1. The foundation is whatever teaching, doctrine, or philosophy to which we subscribe 2. It may be a philosophy or doctrine adopted from others, or developed ourselves [We cannot escape the fact that we are "builders." The question is whether we will be wise or foolish builders. The tests that will determine are called "storms"...] II. THE STORMS ARE THINGS WHICH THREATEN OUR WELL-BEING A. THIS MAY INVOLVE LITERAL STORMS... 1. Such as tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, etc. 2. Which may take away all we own, perhaps even our loved ones 3. How we respond to such tragedies will reveal the quality of our "building" a. Will we be emotionally devastated? b. Will we be able to stand strong, willing to continue on without despair? B. IT MAY ALSO INVOLVE FIGURATIVE STORMS... 1. Such as illness, loss of loved ones, financial setbacks 2. Which may take away our health, family, possessions 3. Again, how we respond to such tragedies will reveal the quality of our "building" a. Will we be emotionally devastated? b. Will we be able to stand strong, willing to continue on without despair? C. THEN THERE IS THE FINAL "STORM" OF LIFE... 1. That of death and the final day of Judgment - cf. He 9:27; Ro 2:4-6 2. Which will be the truest test of our "building" (i.e.,character) - cf. 2Co 5:10-11 3. The Lord will describe the kind of "builder" (or servant) we have been a. E.g., "Well done, good and faithful servant..." - Mt 25:21 b. E.g., "You wicked and lazy servant..." - Mt 25:26 [The longer we live, the more "storms" we are likely to face; and there is the final "storm" that none can escape! How can we be sure to build our lives so as to withstand the storms?] III. OBEYING JESUS IS THE KEY TO WITHSTANDING THE STORMS A. BEING A "HEARER" ONLY IS NOT SUFFICIENT... 1. Such is foolishness, building on a shaky foundation that will not stand the test of storms - Mt 7:26-27 2. As James wrote, one is deceiving only themselves - Jm 1:22-24 3. Like the unscrupulous contractor, the storm will reveal the true quality of one's character 4. As Moses said, "...your sin will find you out."- Num 32:23 B. WE MUST "DO" WHAT JESUS SAYS... 1. Those who "do" what Jesus said will be those to withstand the storms - Mt 7:24-25 2. Because their lives (houses) are built upon the "rock" (a solid foundation) 3. As James went on to write, it is the doer who is blessed in what he does - Jm 1:25 C. HOW THE SAYINGS OF JESUS HELP US WITHSTAND THE STORMS... 1. His saying regarding where to lay up treasure - Mt 6:19-21 a. In which we are told to lay up treasure in heaven, not on earth b. If we heed His words, our hearts will not be distraught if earthly treasures are stolen or lost 2. His saying regarding what to seek first - Mt 6:33 a. Calling upon all to seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness b. By heeding His words, we need not have anxiety for the future 3. Indeed, His sayings provide the basis for a solid foundation in which to build a life... a. That will avoid being misled by false prophets - Mt 7:15-20 b. That will stay on the straight and narrow way that leads to life - Mt 7:13-14 c. That will fulfill the Law and the Prophets - Mt 7:12 d. That will receive what good gifts God desires to give His children - Mt 7:7-11 e. That will not be judged by some inconsistent standard - Mt 7:1-6 f. Where the necessities of life are provided for - Mt 6:30-34 g. Free from materialism and anxiety - Mt 6:22-29 h. With treasure that cannot rust or be stolen - Mt 6:19-21 i. With acts of righteousness that are well-pleasing to God - Mt 6:1-18 j. With righteousness that surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees - Mt 5:20-48 CONCLUSION 1. Yes, this is a life that can truly withstand the storms! a. Whether it be the literal or figurative storms of every day life b. Or the storm of the Day of Wrath and Judgment that is yet to come 2. What kind of foundation are you building your house (life) upon? a. Heed what Jesus is saying, and your life will be solid b. Be listeners only, and your life will be as shaky as sand! Just as Jesus is the Rock-solid foundation of the church (1Co 3:11; Ep 2:20; 1Pe 2:4-6), so let Him be the Rock-solid foundation of your life!


Executable Outlines, Copyright © Mark A. Copeland, 2016

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Martin Luther Speaks on “Faith Only” and Baptism by Kyle Butt, M.Div.

http://apologeticspress.org/APContent.aspx?category=11&article=958

Martin Luther Speaks on “Faith Only” and Baptism

by  Kyle Butt, M.Div.

One popular belief in many protestant denominations is the idea that God supplies salvation to each and every person based solely on the faith of that person, apart from any action taken by that individual. This idea, often called sola fide, says, that a person is saved by faith alone. Any number of quotations demonstrating this doctrine can be cited. In a debate with Thomas Warren in 1953, L.S. Ballard affirmed the position that “the alien sinner is saved the very moment he/she believes that Jesus Christ is the son of God” (Warren and Ballard, 1953). This particular belief is commonly worded like this: “People are saved through Christ alone, by grace alone, through faith alone.”

According to the modern-day advocates of “faith alone” salvation, water baptism cannot be a requisite to salvation, because it is something “more than” faith. While space limitations prevent a thorough investigation of the biblical doctrine of baptism (see Lyons, 2003), it is interesting to note how far the “faith alone” doctrine has drifted from its original form.

The idea of being saved by faith alone is often attributed to Martin Luther. Indeed, he and the other reformers challenged the Catholic Church that sold indulgences and offered a “works-based” type of salvation. Martin Luther often taught that salvation was based on faith alone, and not received based upon a person’s meritorious works. Martin Luther did not, however, take faith alone to mean that mere mental assent to Christ’s deity was sufficient to obtain salvation. In fact, Luther’s idea of faith alone does not conform to the modern-day idea that baptism cannot be required for salvation.

While it is understood that the opinions of men are in no way authoritative when it comes to God’s plan for salvation, it is nonetheless interesting to note that Martin Luther believed wholeheartedly in the necessity of baptism as a requisite for salvation. In his Large Catechism, Luther wrote:

[I] affirm that Baptism is no human trifle, but that it was established by God Himself. Moreover, He earnestly and solemnly commanded that we must be baptized or we shall not be saved. No one is to think that it is an optional matter like putting on a red coat. It is of greatest importance that we hold Baptism in high esteem as something splendid and glorious. The reason why we are striving and battling so strenuously for this view of Baptism is that the world nowadays is full of sects that loudly proclaim that Baptism is merely an external form and that external forms are useless.... Although Baptism is indeed performed by human hands, yet it is truly God’s own action (1978, pp. 98-99).

From Luther’s comments about baptism, it is obvious that he viewed water baptism as essential for salvation. Many of the protestant denominations that attribute their ideas about “faith only” to Martin Luther have not been taught that Luther’s concept of faith alone was not in opposition to works of God (like baptism and repentance), but in opposition to meritorious works by which a person believes that he or she “earns” salvation.

What, then, would Martin Luther say to those today who teach that “faith alone” excludes baptism? Listen to his words pertaining to this teaching:

But our know-it-alls, the new spirit people, claim that faith alone saves and that human works and outward forms contribute nothing to this. We answer: It is of course true that nothing in us does it except faith, as we shall hear later. But these blind leaders of the blind refuse to see that faith must have something in which it believes, that is, something it clings to, something on which to plant its feet and into which to sink its roots. Thus faith clings to the water and believes Baptism to be something in which there is pure salvation and life, not through the water, as I have emphasized often enough, but because God’s name is joined to it.... If follows from this that whoever rejects Baptism rejects God’s word, faith, and the Christ who directs us to Baptism and binds us to it (1978, pp. 101-102).

Martin Luther was a man. He made many mistakes and believed things about the Bible that were not true. It should be noted, however, that the “faith only” doctrine attributed so often to him has been misrepresented on a grand scale. Martin Luther’s words are unambiguous and clear. His “faith only” doctrine did not exclude baptism as necessary for salvation. Could it be the case that those who loudly tout the “faith only” mantra have not thoroughly investigated the works of the man to whom the doctrine is so often attributed?

The Bible does teach that those who are being saved are saved by grace through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9). It does not, however, teach that a person is saved “by faith alone” without any further acts of obedience. Even Martin Luther recognized that water baptism is not a meritorious work that earns a person salvation. On the other hand, it is an obedient act required by God in order for people to obtain salvation.

REFERENCES

Luther, Martin (1978), Luther’s Large Catechism, (Saint Louis, MO: Concordia).

Lyons, Eric (2003), “The Bible’s Teaching on Baptism: Contradictory or Complimentary,” [On-line], URL: http://www.apologeticspress.org/articles/617.

Warren, Thomas B. and L.S. Ballard (1953), The Warren-Ballard Debate, (Moore, OK: National Christian Press).

Marriage Defined by Dave Miller, Ph.D.

http://apologeticspress.org/APContent.aspx?category=11&article=4365

Marriage Defined

by  Dave Miller, Ph.D.

As legislators are fighting over the legitimacy of same-sex marriages, activist judges are claiming constitutional sanction in their redefining of marriage, and the rank and file citizens of these United States are embroiled in a polarizing culture war, it is nevertheless unthinkable that the President of these United States has announced his approval of homosexuality. If God exists and the Bible is His revealed Word, then America is facing imminent peril. The evaporation of Christian principles from American civilization will lead to the extinction of civility, freedom, and morality.

In the midst of such depressing circumstances, the spiritually minded may find refreshment in the words of bygone U.S. Supreme Courts. For example, in the 1885 case of Murphy v. Ramsey that addressed the legitimacy of polygamy, the high court declared:

For certainly no legislation can be supposed more wholesome and necessary in the founding of a free, self-governing commonwealth, fit to take rank as one of the coordinate States of the Union, than that which seeks to establish it on the basis of the idea of the family, as consisting in and springing from the union for life of one man and one woman in the holy estate of matrimony; the sure foundation of all that is stable and noble in our civilization; the best guaranty of that reverent morality which is the source of all beneficent progress in social and political improvement (1885, emp. added).

Observe that the high Court insisted that the stability of a nation and its proper progress rely on the home composed of one man for one woman for life—the precise declaration of God Himself (Genesis 2:24). For most of American history, courts have had no trouble recognizing and reaffirming the idea of the family and the historic definition of marriage. Such thinking was in complete agreement with and based upon the Bible (Genesis 2:24).

In another U.S. Supreme Court case, Reynolds v. United States, after conceding the constitutional right to freedom of religion, the high court nevertheless repudiated polygamy as a punishable offense against society and reaffirmed the foundational importance of monogamy: “Marriage, while from its very nature a sacred obligation, is nevertheless, in most civilized nations, a civil contract, and usually regulated by law. Upon it society may be said to be built” (1879, emp. added). Those legal sentiments reflected the views of the vast majority of Americans for the first 180+ years of American history. Departure from that social norm—one man and one woman—results in the destabilization of society.

No wonder in 1848, the Supreme Court of South Carolina articulated the sentiment of the Founders and early Americans regarding what will happen if Christian morality is abandoned:

What constitutes the standard of good morals? Is it not Christianity? There certainly is none other. Say that cannot be appealed to and...what would be good morals? The day of moral virtue in which we live would, in an instant, if that standard were abolished, lapse into the dark and murky night of pagan immorality (City Council of Charleston..., emp. added).

Practitioners of unscriptural divorce, homosexuality, and other sinister behaviors are slowly but surely eroding and dissolving the moral foundations of American civilization—what the Court called “the sure foundation of all that is stable and noble in our civilization.” Will America awaken from this spiritual stupor? Will Christians rise up and react in time? The time has come for those who still retain their moral sensibilities to recognize that we are in a full-scale, unmistakable war—a culture war—a spiritual war of seismic proportions against the governmental authorities and cultural forces that now are openly hostile toward God, Christ, and the Bible. May we take heart and commit ourselves to this critical struggle, as we consider the words of God through Paul:

Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this age, against spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand (Ephesians 6:10-13, emp. added).

REFERENCES

City Council of Charleston v. Benjamin (1848), 2 Strob. L. 508 (S.C. 1848).

Murphy v. Ramsey (1885), 114 U.S. 15; 5 S. Ct. 747; 29 L. Ed. 47; 1885 U.S. LEXIS 1732.

Reynolds v. United States (1879), 98 U.S. 145; 25 L. Ed. 244; 1878 U.S. LEXIS 1374; 8 Otto 145.

Male and Female Roles: Gender in the Bible by Dave Miller, Ph.D.

http://apologeticspress.org/APContent.aspx?category=11&article=5007

Male and Female Roles: Gender in the Bible

by  Dave Miller, Ph.D.

In little more than half a century, American culture has experienced a massive restructuring of values and reorientation of moral and spiritual standards. One facet of this multifaceted effacement and erosion of biblical values has been dramatically altered gender roles. The feminist agenda has penetrated the American social landscape. Indeed, the onset of the feminist movement in the turbulent 1960s sparked a significant adjustment of societal norms resulting in the transformation of virtually every sphere of American culture—from the home and the church to the business world and beyond. Women now routinely serve in historically male capacities, including the military, politics, sports, and a host of community services including fire, police, ambulance, etc.

Make no mistake, a number of changes with regard to gender have emerged that may be deemed beneficial and positive. Nevertheless, the overall impact on American civilization has been negative, and the erosion of femininity has ushered in a host of evils that are hastening America’s moral implosion (e.g., abortion and homosexuality). Concomitant with the effort to eradicate gender differentiation has been the degradation of masculinity and the restructuring of the family unit (the fundamental building block of humanity—Genesis 1:27; 2:24). As womanhood has been devalued and her function altered, the rest of society has suffered dramatically. After all, women inevitably exert a profound influence on culture and society—for good or ill. Virtuous femininity is the glue that holds human civilization together. In the words of American poet William Ross Wallace’s immortal poem, “The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, Rules the World” (1865). Sadly for America, feminism has overturned the rocker, thrown the baby out with the bathwater, punched Dad in the face, and stomped away from the house in a huff.

the bible still has the correct perspective

Amid this polarization that plagues American civilization in general, and Christendom in particular, one chasm continues to widen between those who wish to conform to Bible protocol and those who wish to modernize, update, and adapt Scripture to a changing society. The cry of those who are pressing the feminist agenda is that the church in the past has restricted women in roles of leadership and worship simply because of culture and flawed hermeneutical principles. They say we are the product of a male-dominated society and have consequently misconstrued the contextual meaning of the relevant biblical passages.

The underlying catalyst for this social turmoil, and resulting gender confusion, has been the rejection of the Bible as the authentic Word of the divine Being Who created the Universe and humans. Even among those who continue to profess their allegiance to Christianity, large numbers have capitulated to political correctness and abandoned the traditional, i.e., biblical, depiction of gender roles as defined by the Creator. In their quest to maintain relevance among the shifting sands of secular culture, they have imbibed the spirit of the age, been infected by humanistic philosophy, and consequently have compromised the clear teaching of Scripture on the role of women (cf. “Gender Inclusive…,” 2013; “Believe It…,” 2006; Pauls, 2013; “The Role of…,” 2006; Stirman, 2010).

As attitudes soften and biblical conviction weakens, Scripture is being reinterpreted to allow for expanded roles for women in worship. If one who studies the biblical text concludes that women are not to be restricted in worship, he is hailed as engaging in “fresh scholarly exegesis.” But the one who studies the text and concludes that God intended for women to be subordinate to male leadership in worship is guilty of prejudice and being unduly influenced by “Church tradition” or “cultural baggage.” How is it that the former’s religious practice and interpretation of Scripture is somehow curiously exempt from imbibing the spirit of an age in which feminist ideology has permeated virtually every segment of American society?

Nevertheless, Bible teaching on this subject is not that difficult to ascertain. Recent attempts to redefine gender roles fall flat, not only before a sensible assessment of relevant Bible passages on the subject, but in the face of the 2,000 year history of Christianity which has, for the most part, demonstrated a generally accurate grasp of the basic parameters of God’s will on this matter. Such has certainly been true in America where the Founders and 18th century men and women embraced the Christian worldview, and believed that “family integrity was indispensable for the public safety and happiness” (West, 1997, p. 85).

Relevant Bible Passages

A detailed study of the relevant biblical texts in one article is impossible. However, God’s Word is essentially simple on any significant subject in the Bible [NOTE: For useful discussions see Hicks and Morton, 1978; Piper and Grudem, 1991; Cottrell, 1992; Highers, 1991; Laws, 1994; Warren, 1975; Miller, 1994; Miller, 1996.] In fact, it is the more recently emerging “scholars” with their intellectual complexities and imported seminary bias that have contributed to the confusion over this subject (e.g., Osburn, 1993). Carroll Osburn summarized his discussion of 1 Timothy 2 in the words—“Put simply, any female who has sufficient and accurate information may teach that information in a gentle spirit to whomever in whatever situation they may be” (1994, p. 115). Is such a cavalier attitude to be allowed to so easily dismiss the historical and biblical distinction between the sexes? The reader is invited to give consideration to the following brief summary of New Testament teaching on the subject of the role of women in leadership in worship and the church.

1 Corinthians

Chapters 11 and 14 of First Corinthians constitute a context dealing with disorders in the worship assembly. The entire pericope of 11:2-14:40 concerns the worship assembly, i.e., “when you come together” (cf. 11:17,18,20,33; 14:23-26). Paul articulated the transcultural principle for all people throughout history in 11:3—“But I want you to know that the head of every man is Christ, the head of woman is man, and the head of Christ is God.” “Head” clearly refers not to “source” but to “authority” (see Grudem, 1985, pp. 38-59). Therefore, God intends for women to be subordinate to men. [NOTE: The equality of male and female in Galatians 3:28 pertains to salvation status, not role.] Corinthian women were obviously removing their veils and stepping forward in the assembly to lead with their Spirit-imparted, miraculous capabilities, i.e., prophecy (12:10; 14:31) and prayer (14:14-15). Such activity was a direct violation of the subordination principle, articulated by Paul in chapter 14. In chapter 11, he focused on the propriety of females removing the cultural symbol of submission.

The women were removing their veils because they understood that to stand and exercise a spiritual gift in the assembly was an authoritative act of leadership. They recognized that to wear a symbol of submission to authority (the veil) while simultaneously conducting oneself in an authoritative fashion (to lead in worship) was self-contradictory. Paul’s insistence that women keep their veils on during the worship assembly amounted to an implicit directive to refrain from leading in the assembly—a directive stated explicitly in 14:34. The allusions to Creation law (11:7-9; cf. 14:34) underscore the fact that Paul saw the restrictions on women as rooted in the created ordernot culture. Also, Paul made clear that such restrictions applied equally to all churches of Christ (11:16).

Later in the same context (in chapter 14), Paul addresses further the confusion over spiritual gifts and returns specifically to the participation of women in the exercise of those gifts in the assembly. He again emphasizes the universal practice of churches of Christ: “as in all churches of the saints” (14:33). [NOTE: Grammatically, “as in all churches of the saints” links with “let your women keep silence.” Cf. the ASV, RSV, NIV, NEB, NAB, etc.] The women who possessed miraculous gifts were not to exercise them in the mixed worship assembly of the church. To do so was disgraceful—“a shame” (14:35). To insist upon doing so was equivalent to (1) presuming to be the authors of God’s Word, and (2) assuming that God’s standards do not apply to everyone (14:36).

Granted, 1 Corinthians chapters 11 and 14 address a unique situation. After all, spiritual gifts are no longer available to the church (1 Corinthians 13:8-11; see Miller, 2003a), and veils, in Western society, are no longer a cultural symbol of female submission (see Miller, 2003b; cf. Moore, 1998). Nevertheless, both passages demonstrate the clear application of the transcultural principle (female subordination in worship) to a specific cultural circumstance. The underlying submission principle remains intact as an inbuilt constituent element of the created order.

1 Timothy 2: The Central Scripture

I desire therefore that the men pray everywhere, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting; in like manner also, that the women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with propriety and moderation, not with braided hair or gold or pearls or costly clothing, but, which is proper for women professing godliness, with good works. Let a woman learn in silence with all submission. And I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man, but to be in silence. For Adam was formed first, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived, fell into transgression. Nevertheless she will be saved in childbearing if they continue in faith, love, and holiness, with self-control (1 Timothy 2:8-15).

The premier passage in the New Testament that treats the role of women in worship is 1 Timothy 2:8-15. The remote context of the book is proper behavior in the life of the church (1 Timothy 3:15). The immediate context of chapter two is worship, specifically prayer (1 Timothy 2:1,8). The context does not limit the worship to the church assembly, but includes the general life of the church.

In this passage, Paul affirms that adult males (andras) are to lead prayers anywhere people meet for worship. “Lifting up holy hands” is a figure of speech, metonymy, in which a posture of prayer is put in place of prayer itself. Their prayers are to usher forth from holy lives. On the other hand, women are admonished to focus on appropriate apparel and a submissive attitude. Notice the contrast framed in the passage: Men need to be holy, spiritual leaders in worship while women need to be modest and unassuming. “Silence” and “subjection” in this passage relate specifically to the exercise of spiritual authority over adult males in the church. “Usurp” (KJV) is not in the original text. Authentein should be translated “to have (or exercise) authority” (NKJV, ESV, NIV, RSV, NASB). Thus Paul instructed women not to teach nor in any other way to have authority over men in worship.

Why? Why would an inspired apostle place such limitations on Christian women? Was his concern prompted by the culture of that day? Was Paul merely accommodating an unenlightened, hostile environment, stalling for time and keeping prejudice to a minimum, until he could teach them the Gospel? Absolutely not. The Holy Spirit gives the reason for the limitations, and that reason transcends all culture and all locales. Paul states that women are not to exercise spiritual authority over men because Adam was created before Eve. Here we are given the heart and core of God’s will concerning how men and women are to function and interrelate. But what does the chronological priority of Adam have to do with the interrelationship of male and female?

Grounded in Creation—Not Culture

Paul is saying that God’s original design for the human race entailed the creation of the male first as an indication of his responsibility to be the spiritual leader of the home. He was created to function as the head or leader in the home and in the church. That is his functional purpose. Woman, on the other hand, was specifically designed and created for the purpose of being a subordinate—though not inferior—assistant. God could have created the woman first, but He did not. He could have created both male and female simultaneously,but He did not. His action was intended to convey His will with regard to gender as it relates to the interrelationship of man and woman.

This feature of Creation explains why God gave spiritual teaching to Adam before Eve was created, implying that Adam had the created responsibility to teach his wife (Genesis 2:15-17). It explains why the female is twice stated to have been created to be “an help meet for him,” i.e., a helper suitable for the man (Genesis 2:18,20, emp. added). This explains why the Genesis text clearly indicates that in a unique sense, the woman was created for the man—not vice versa. It explains why God brought the woman “to the man” (Genesis 2:22), again, as if she was made “for him”—not vice versa. Adam confirmed this understanding by stating “the woman whom You gave to be with me” (Genesis 3:12, emp. added). It explains why Paul argued in the Corinthian letter on the basis of this very distinction: “Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man” (1 Corinthians 11:9, emp. added). It further clarifies the implied authority of the man over the women in his act of naming the woman (Genesis 2:23; 3:20). The Jews understood this divinely designed order, evidenced by the practice of primogeniture—the firstborn male. God’s creation of the man first was specifically intended to communicate the authority/submission arrangement of the human race (cf. 1 Corinthians 11:8).

Observe that Paul next elaborates on this principle in 1 Timothy 2:14 by noting an example of what can happen when men and women tamper with God’s original intentions. When Eve took the spiritual initiative above her husband, and Adam failed to take the lead and exercise spiritual authority over his wife, Satan was able to wreak havoc on the home and cause the introduction of sin into the world (Genesis 3). When Paul said the woman was deceived, he was not suggesting that women are more gullible than men. Rather, when men or women fail to confine themselves to their created function, but instead tamper with and act in violation of divinely intended roles, spiritual vulnerability to sin naturally follows.

God’s appraisal of the matter was seen when He confronted the pair. He spoke first to the head of the home—the man (Genesis 3:9). His subsequent declaration to Eve reaffirmed the fact that she was not to yield to the inclination to take the lead in spiritual matters. Rather, she was to submit to the rule of her husband (Genesis 3:16; cf. 4:4). When God said to Adam, “Because you have heeded the voice of your wife...” (Genesis 3:17), He was calling attention to the fact that Adam had failed to exercise spiritual leadership, thereby circumventing the divine arrangement of male-female relations.

Paul concludes his instructions by noting how women may be preserved from falling into the same trap of assuming unauthorized authority: “She will be saved in childbearing” (1 Timothy 2:15). “Childbearing” is the figure of speech known as synecdoche in which a part stands for the whole. Thus, Paul was referring to the whole of female responsibility. Women may avoid taking to themselves illicit functions by concentrating on the functions assigned to them by God, undertaken with faith, love, and holiness in sobriety (i.e., self-control).

Some argue that this text applies to husbands and wives rather than to men and women in general. However, the context of 1 Timothy is not the home, but the church (1 Timothy 3:15). Likewise, the use of the plural with the absence of the article in 2:9 and 2:11 suggests women in general. Nothing in the context would cause one to conclude that Paul was referring only to husbands and wives. Besides, would Paul restrict wives from leadership roles in the church—but then permit single women to lead?

Deaconesses

Those who advocate expanded roles for women in the church appeal to the alleged existence of deaconesses in the New Testament. Only two passages even hint of such an office: Romans 16:1-2 and 1 Timothy 3:11. In Romans 16:1, the term translated “servant” in the KJV is the Greek word diakonos, an indeclinable term meaning “one who serves or ministers.” It is of common gender (i.e., may refer to men or women) and occurs in the following verses: Matthew 20:26; 22:13; 23:11; Mark 9:35; 10:43; John 2:5,9; 12:26; Romans 13:4; 15:8; 1 Corinthians 3:5; 16:1; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 6:4; 11:15,23; Galatians 2:17; Ephesians 3:7; 6:21; Philippians 1:1; Colossians 1:7,23,25; 4:7; 1 Thessalonians 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:8,12; 4:6.

The term is used in the New Testament in two senses. First, it is used as a technical term for a formal office in the church to which one may be appointed by meeting certain qualifications. Second, it is used as a non-technical term for the informal activity of serving or attending to. Additional words in the New Testament that have both a technical and non-technical meaning include “apostle,” “elder,” and “shepherd.” To be rational in one’s analysis of a matter, one must draw only those conclusions that are warranted by the evidence. In the matter of deaconesses, one should only conclude that a deaconess is being referred to when the context plainly shows the office is under consideration.

In Romans 13:4, the civil government is said to be God’s deacon. In Romans 15:8, Christ is said to be a deacon of the Jews. In 2 Corinthians 3:6 and 6:4, Paul is said to be a deacon of the New Covenant and a deacon of God. Apollos is listed with Paul as a deacon in 1 Corinthians 3:5. Obviously, these are all non-technical uses of the term referring to the service or assistance being rendered.

Nothing in the context of Romans 16:1 warrants the conclusion that Paul was describing Phoebe as an official appointee—a deaconess. “Our sister” designates her church membership and “servant” specifies the special efforts she extended to the church in Cenchrea where she was an active, caring member. Being a “servant of the church” no more implies a formal appointee than does the expression in Colossians 1:25 where Paul is said to be the church’s servant.

Some have insisted that the term in Romans 16:2 translated “help” implies a technical usage. It is true that prostatis can mean a helper in the sense of presiding with authority. But this word carries the same inbuilt obscurity that diakonos does in that it has a formal and informal sense. But since the verse explicitly states that Phoebe was a “helper” to Paul, the non-technical usage must be in view. She would not have exercised authority over Paul. Even his fellow apostles did not do that since he exercised high authority direct from the Lord (1 Corinthians 14:37-38; Galatians 1:6-12; 2 Thessalonians 3:14). Only Christ wielded authority over Paul.

Romans 16:2 actually employs a play on words. Paul told the Corinthians to “help” (paristemi) Phoebe since she has been a “help” (prostatis) to many, including Paul himself. While the masculine noun prostates can mean “leader,” the actual feminine noun prostatis means “protectress, patroness, helper” (Arndt and Gingrich, 1957, p. 718). Paul was saying, “Help Phoebe as she has helped others and me.” She had been a concerned, generous, hospitable, dedicated contributor to the Lord’s work. Paul was paying her a tremendous tribute and expressing publicly the honor due her. But he was not acknowledging her as an office holder in the church.

The second passage that some have appealed to in order to find sanction for deaconesses in the church is 1 Timothy 3:11. In the midst of a listing of the qualifications of deacons, Paul referred to women. What women? Was Paul referring to the wives of the church officers, or was he referring to female appointees, i.e., deaconesses? Once again, the underlying Greek term is of no help in answering this question since gunaikas (from gune) also has both a technical and non-technical sense. It can mean a “wife” or simply a “female” or “woman.” It is used both ways in 1 Timothy: “female” in 2:9-12,14 and “wife” in 3:2,12; 5:9.

Five contextual observations, however, provide assistance in ascertaining the meaning of the passage. First, a woman cannot be “the husband of one wife” (3:12). Second, in a discussion of male deacons from 3:8-13, it would be unusual to switch in the middle to female deacons for one verse without some clarification. Third, referring to the wives of church officers would be appropriate since family conduct is a qualifying concern (3:2,4-5,12). Fourth, “likewise” (3:11) could simply mean that wives are to have similar virtues as the deacons without implying they share the same office (cf. 1 Timothy 5:25; Titus 2:3). Fifth, lack of the possessive genitive with gunaikas (“of deacons”) or “their” does not rule out wives of deacons since neither is used in other cases where men/women are being described as wives/husbands (Colossians 3:18-19; Ephesians 5:22-25; 1 Corinthians 7:2-4,11,14,33; Matthew 18:25; Mark 10:2).

Insufficient textual evidence exists to warrant the conclusion that the office of deaconess is referred to in the New Testament. Outside the New Testament, Pliny, Governor of Bythynia, wrote a letter to Emperor Trajan about A.D. 110 referring in Latin to two ministrae (female ministers). This term has the same ambiguity within it that diakonos has. He could have been referring to official appointees, or he just as easily could have been referring simply to servants. In any case, a passing reference by an uninformed non-Christian is hardly trustworthy evidence. Christian historical sources from this same period do not refer to the existence of female appointees even though they do discuss church organization (Lewis, 1988, p. 108).

Not until the late third century in the Syrian Didascalia do we find reference to deaconesses. Their work consisted of assisting at the baptism of women, going into homes of heathens where believing women lived, and visiting the sick (ministering to them and bathing them). A full-blown church order of deaconesses does not appear until the fourth/fifth centuries. Again, their responsibilities consisted of keeping the doors, aiding in female baptisms, and doing other work with women (Lewis, pp. 108-109). Those within the church today who are pressing for deaconesses and expanded roles for women would hardly be content with such tasks.

Even if women were deacons in the New Testament church, they would not have functioned in any sort of leadership or authority position over men. They were not to be appointed as elders. If Acts 6:1-5 refers to the appointment of deacons (the verb form is used) in the Jerusalem church (Woods, 1986, p. 199), they were all males and their specific task entailed distribution of physical assistance to widows.

The evidence is simply lacking. The existence of a female deaconate within the New Testament cannot be demonstrated. Those who insist upon establishing such an office do so without the authority of the Scriptures behind them.

unequal or inferior?

A final word needs to be said concerning the fact that both men and women must remember that Bible teaching on difference in role in no way implies a difference in worth, value, or ability. Galatians 3:28 (“neither male nor female”), 1 Timothy 2:15 (“she shall be saved”), and 1 Peter 3:7 (“heirs together of the grace of life”) all show that males and females are equals as far as their person and salvation status is concerned. Women are often superior to men in talent, intellect, and ability. Women are not inferior to men anymore than Christ is inferior to God, citizens are inferior to the President, or church members are inferior to elders. The role of women in the church is not a matter of control, power, or oppression. It is a matter of submission on the part of all human beings to the will of God (Ephesians 5:21). It is a matter of willingness on the part of God’s creatures, male and female, to subordinate themselves to the divine arrangement regarding the sexes. The biblical differentiation is purely a matter of function, assigned tasks, and sphere of responsibility. The question for us is: “How willing am I to fit myself into God’s arrangement?”

Conclusion

The role of gender, like most of the values of Western civilization, is in the throes of confusion and redefinition. Those who resist unbiblical redefinitions are considered tradition-bound, narrow-minded, chauvinistic misogynists, as if they cannot hold honest, unbiased, studied convictions on such matters; as if the Bible has been misunderstood all these years. If the Bible authorized it, no man should have any personal aversion to women having complete access to leadership roles in the church. Indeed, many talented, godly women possess abilities and talents that would enable them to surpass many of the male worship leaders functioning in the church today.

Those who reject the divine inspiration of the Bible will remain unaffected by and disinterested in the teaching of the Bible regarding gender. However, the Bible stands as an unalterable, eternal declaration of God’s will on the matter. By those words we will be judged (John 12:48). For those who respect the Bible as the Word of God, Bible teaching is fatal to the notion of female leadership in the church and home. May we all bow humbly and submissively before the God of Heaven.

References

Arndt, William F. and F. Wilbur Gingrich (1957), A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press).

“Believe It Or Not” (2006), Christianity: Then and Now, ed. John Waddey, 5[11], July, http://www.christianity-then-and-now.com/PDF/CTN%20July%2006.pdf.

Cottrell, Jack (1992), Feminism and the Bible (Joplin, MO: College Press).

“Gender Inclusive and Egalitarian Churches in the Church of Christ Heritage” (2013), http://www.wherethespiritleads.org/gender_inclusive_churches.htm.

Grudem, Wayne (1985), “Does kephale (‘head’) Mean ‘Source’ or ‘Authority over’ in Greek Literature? A Survey of 2,336 Examples,” Trinity Journal, 6 NS, 38-59.

Hicks, John, and Bruce Morton (1978), Woman’s Role in the Church (Shreveport, LA: Lambert Book House).

Highers, Alan, ed., (1991), “Role of Women in the Church,” The Spiritual Sword, 22[2], January.

Laws, Jim, ed. (1994), Women To The Glory of God (Memphis, TN: Getwell Church of Christ).

Lewis, Jack (1988), Exegesis of Difficult Passages (Searcy, AR: Resource Publications).

Miller, Dave (1994), “An Exegesis of 1 Tim. 2:11-15 (Part 1) & (Part 2),” The Restorer, 14[3]:12-16 & 14[4]:9-14, March & April.

Miller, Dave (1996), “Feminist Attitudes Toward the Bible,” The Spiritual Sword, 27[2]:3-6, January.

Miller, Dave (2003a), “Modern-Day Miracles, Tongue-Speaking, and Holy Spirit Baptism: A Refutation,” http://apologeticspress.org/apcontent.aspx?category=11&article=1399.

Miller, Dave (2003b), “Veils, Footwashing, and the Holy Kiss,” Apologetics Press, http://apologeticspress.org/APContent.aspx?category=11&article=1275&topic=379.

Moore, Kevin (1998), We Have No Such Custom (Wanganui, NZ: Kevin Moore).

Osburn, Carroll, ed. (1993), Essays On Women in Earliest Christianity (Joplin, MO: College Press).

Osburn, Carroll (1994), Women in the Church (Abilene, TX: Restoration Perspectives).

Pauls, Dale (2013), “Good news!: Naomi Walters Named Minister in Residence at Stamford Church of Christ,” Reflections on Announcement, July 7, http://gal328.org/category/good-news/.

Piper, John and Wayne Grudem, eds. (1991), Recovering Biblical Manhood & Womanhood (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books).

“The Role of Women in the Church” (2006), Cole Mill Road Church of Christ, http://www.colemillroad.org/.

Stirman, Sarah (2010), “Women in the Church: Moving Toward Equality,” Abilene Report-News, February 25, http://www.reporternews.com/news/2010/feb/25/women-in-the-church-moving-toward-equality/

Wallace, William Ross (1865), “The Hand That Rocks The Cradle Is The Hand That Rules The World,” Poets’ Corner, http://www.theotherpages.org/poems/wallace1.html.

Warren, Thomas, ed. (1975), “Woman—In the View of God,” The Spiritual Sword, 6[4], July.

West, Thomas (1997), Vindicating the Founders (New York: Rowman & Littlefield).

Woods, Guy N. (1986), Questions and Answers: Volume Two (Nashville, TN: Gospel Advocate).

One Everlasting Whisper by Jim McGuiggan


http://theabidingword.com/logos/index.html

One Everlasting Whisper

Somebody must have seen his promise as he was growing up. Maybe he was a quiet studious boy but his record doesn’t suggest that. Clearly he was a high-energy person because when he was young he was there, right up front, watching as they were killing a preacher man called Stephen (Acts 7.38) and he was on a high-energy job  (Acts 8:3;9:1, 22:3-4, 26:10-11) when the risen Lord Jesus stepped out on to the road and gave him a new high-energy task (Acts 9:13-19; 22:13-16; 26:14-18). Paul knew all about Jesus unless he was blind and deaf and mute. Everyone was talking about His miracles, His teaching, His death and the miracles being wrought in His name (a dead heretic’s name?)—see Acts 3—5 and Gamaliel’s speech. Then there was Stephen’s message, his glorious appearance (Acts 6.15), his vision of Jesus and his echoing of Jesus’ prayer (6:15; 7:55-56, 60). All this might have been gnawing at Saul and could be what Jesus had in mind when He spoke of goads that were stabbing him (26:14).

There were all kinds of voices and successes that would have been calling Saul telling him he was in the right place, that he should stay where he was, urging him to stay among the big-hitters, “Get the praise, hear them whisper your name when you enter the synagogue or temple, get more letters of recommendation and diplomas (cf. 2 Corinthians 3:1; Philippians 3:4-7). This is the place! They’ll have multiple festschrifts for you. You’re doing the right thing! You’ll be quoted and noted wherever you go.”

But Jesus wasn’t having it and neither was Paul! Someone had ‘whispered’ to him and it was goodbye to the glories of the Jewish academy, comfort, the praise and hello to lifelong criticism, abandonment and loneliness in the company of the Lord Jesus, the self-revelation of God. That man, Paul (not quite single-handedly) wrestled the gospel of God from the clutches of a narrow Jewish nationalism and died saying, “It’s for the world!!!” Thanks to him (God in him, but not God without him) we now get the blessings!
If people asked him why it was that he ran all over the Mediterranean world, establishing and organizing little assemblies of believers in the Lord Jesus Christ and being beaten and slandered and often abandoned he led to Christ–if they asked him that he would say, “The love of Christ leaves me no choice,” (2 Corinthians 514, NEB).

He makes me think of Rudyard Kipling’s 1898 extended poem. The Explorer. (‘The Missionary’ works better for us.)

There’s no sense in going further—
It’s the edge of cultivation,”
So they said , and I believed them
Broke my land and sowed my crop—
Built my barns and strung my fences
In the little border station
Tucked away below the foothills
Where the trails run out and stop.

Till a voice, as bad as Conscience,
rang interminable changes
In one everlasting Whisper
day and night repeated — so:
“Something hidden. Go and find it.
Go and look behind the Ranges —
Something lost behind the Ranges.
Lost and waiting for you. Go!”

So I went, worn out of patience;
never told my nearest neighbours —
Stole away with pack and ponies —
left ’em drinking in the town;
And the faith that moveth mountains
didn’t seem to help my labours
As I faced the sheer main-ranges,
whipping up and leading down.

March by march I puzzled through ’em,
turning flanks and dodging shoulders,
Hurried on in hope of water,
headed back for lack of grass;
Till I camped above the tree-line —
drifted snow and naked boulders —
Felt free air astir to windward —
knew I’d stumbled on the Pass.

‘Thought to name it for the finder;
but that night the Norther found me —
Froze and killed the plains-bred ponies;
so I called the camp Despair.
(It’s the Railway Gap today, though.)
Then my whisper waked to hound me:
“Something lost behind the Ranges.
Over yonder! Go you there!”

Then I knew, the while I doubted —
knew His Hand was certain o’er me.
Still — it might be self-delusion —
scores of better men had died —
I could reach the township living,
but … He knows what terrors tore me …
But I didn’t … but I didn’t.
I went down the other side.

Till the snow ran out in flowers,
and the flowers turned to aloes,
And the aloes sprung to thickets
and a brimming stream ran by;
But the thickets dwined to thorn-scrub,
and the water drained to shallows,
And I dropped again on
desert-blasted earth and blasting sky …

I remember lighting fires;
I remember sitting by them;
I remember seeing faces,
hearing voices through the smoke;
I remember they were fancy —
for I threw a stone to try ’em.
“Something lost behind the Ranges”
was the only word they spoke.

I remember going crazy.
I remember that I knew it
When I heard myself hallooing
to the funny folk I saw.
Very full of dreams that desert;
but my two legs took me through it …
And I used to watch ’em moving
with the toes all black and raw.

But at last the country altered —
Tough Man’s country past disputing —
Rolling grass and open timber,
with a hint of hills behind —
There I found me food and water,
and I lay a week recruiting,
Got my strength and lost my nightmares.
Then I entered on my find.

Thence I ran my first rough survey —
chose my trees and blazed and ringed ’em —
Week by week I pried and sampled —
week by week my findings grew.
Saul, he went to look for donkeys,
and by God he found a kingdom!
But by God, who sent His Whisper,
I had struck the worth of two!

Up along the hostile mountains,
where the hair-poised snowslide shivers —
Down and through the big fat marshes
that the virgin ore-bed stains,
Till I heard the mild-wide mutterings
of unimagined rivers,
And beyond the nameless timber
saw illimitable plains!

Plotted sites of future cities,
traced the easy grades between ’em;
Watched unharnessed rapids wasting
fifty thousand head an hour;
Counted leagues of water frontage
through the axe-ripe woods that screen ’em —
Saw the plant to feed a people —
up and waiting for the power!

Well, I know who’ll take the credit —
all the clever chaps that followed —
Came a dozen men together —
never knew my desert fears;
Tracked me by the camps I’d quitted,
used the water holes I’d hollowed.
They’ll go back and do the talking.
They’ll be called the Pioneers!

They will find my sites of townships —
not the cities that I set there.
They will rediscover rivers —
not my rivers heard at night.
By my own old marks and bearings
they will show me how to get there,
By the lonely cairns I builded
they will guide my feet aright.

Have I named one single river:
Have I claimed one single acre?
Have I kept one single nugget —
(barring samples?) No, not I!
Because my price was paid me
ten times over by my Maker.
But you wouldn’t understand it.
You go up and occupy.

Ores you’ll find there; wood and cattle;
water-transit sure and steady,
(That should keep the railway rates down;)
coal and iron at your doors.
God took care to hide that country
till He judged His people ready,
Then He chose me for His Whisper,
and I’ve found it, and it’s yours!

Yes, your “never-never country” —
yes, your “edge of cultivation”
And “no sense in going further” —
till I crossed the range to see.
God forgive me! No, I didn’t.
It’s God’s present to our nation.
Anybody might have found it —
but His Whisper came to Me!

SOCIAL DRINKING? BY STEVE FINNELL


http://steve-finnell.blogspot.com/2017/03/social-drinking-by-steve-finnell-is.html

SOCIAL DRINKING?   BY STEVE FINNELL


Is social drinking acceptable for Christians? Judgement and motor performance are negatively affected when involved in moderate drinking of alcohol. Impairment starts with the the first drink of alcohol. People drink because of the intoxicating effects. Remove the alcohol and social drinking would be reduced to coffee, tea, lemonade, sodas, and milk shakes. No one drinks alcohol because it tastes good.

Drunkenness is always preceded by social drinking.

Proverbs 20:1 Wine is a mocker, strong drink a brawler, And whoever is intoxicated by it is not wise.

Does social drinking lead to wisdom?

Proverbs 21:17 He who loves pleasure will become a poor man; He who loves wine and oil will not become rich.

Is wine drinking the gateway to prosperity?

Proverbs 23:20 Do not be with heavy drinkers of wine, or with gluttonous eaters of meat;

Does social drinking lend itself to a poor choice of friends?

Proverbs 23:31-35 Do not look on the wine when it is red, When it sparkles in the cup, When it goes down smoothly; 32 At the last it bites like a serpent And stings like a viper. 33 Your eyes will see strange things And you mind will utter perverse things.......

Is social drinking harmless? No Christian honestly believes that social drinking is harmless.

Romans 14:21 It is good not to eat meat or to drink wine, or to do anything by which your brother stumbles.

Who does not know of a Christian who has stumbled because of drinking alcohol? Wine drinking is not a good example to be setting for fellow Christians.

1 Corinthians 6:10 not thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God.

Show me a social drinker who says they never get drunk  occasionally and I will show you someone who has a problem with telling the truth.


A thief who seals infrequently is still a thief.
A murderer who kills infrequently is till a murderer.
A drunkard who get drunk only on special occasions is still a drunkard.

JESUS APPROVED OF SOCIAL DRINKING. DID HE REALLY??????

The Christians who like to feel good about their social drinking like to use the wedding feast at Cana as their proof-text to justify their alcohol consummation. (John 2:1-12)
If Jesus was turning water into intoxicating wine for those who where drunk or trying to get drunk, then, Jesus would have been guilty of sin. JESUS WAS NOT A SINNER.

Christians who drink socially need to reevaluate there motives for their alcohol consumption.

If social drinking is acceptable to God, then beer and wine should be served at all church functions where coffee and soft drinks are served.------ I THINK NOT. 

(Scripture from : NEW AMERICAN STANDARD BIBLE)

My soul waits for the Lord by Roy Davison

http://www.oldpaths.com/Archive/Davison/Roy/Allen/1940/wait.html

My soul waits for the Lord

"I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in His word I do hope. My soul waits for the Lord more than those who watch for the morning -- Yes, more than those who watch for the morning" (Psalm 130:5, 6).

What does it mean to wait for the Lord?

To wait means to be alert to something expected or anticipated. To wait for a bus means that we have decided not to walk, but to use public transportation. We must wait, because the bus has not yet arrived. We wait patiently because we have looked at the timetable and believe that the bus will come. We also know that when the bus does arrive, we must be waiting at the right stop.

Sometimes we become impatient. We think, "That bus is not coming!" So we leave the bus stop and start walking. Suddenly the bus zooms by. It does not stop, of course, because there is no bus stop there. Through impatience, we missed our chance.

To wait for the Lord means to continually look to Him for assistance and salvation, to be satisfied that God will work everything out.

If you were lost in a forest at night, you would be waiting, even longing for the morning light. Our souls should be waiting and longing for the help that only God can give.

"I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in His word I do hope. My soul waits for the Lord more than those who watch for the morning -- Yes, more than those who watch for the morning" (Psalm 130:5, 6).

"I will lift up my eyes to the hills -- From whence comes my help? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth" (Psalm 121:1, 2).

"For since the beginning of the world men have not heard nor perceived by the ear, nor has the eye seen any God besides You, Who acts for the one who waits for Him" (Isaiah 64:4).

We wait for God continually: "To You, O Lord, I lift up my soul. O my God, I trust in You; let me not be ashamed; let not my enemies triumph over me. Indeed, let no one who waits on You be ashamed; let those be ashamed who deal treacherously without cause. Show me Your ways, O Lord; teach me Your paths. Lead me in Your truth and teach me, for You are the God of my salvation; on You I wait all the day" (Psalm 25:1-5).

We have courage to face the difficulties of live because we look to God for the help He has promised: "I would have lost heart, unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Wait on the Lord; be of good courage, and He shall strengthen your heart; wait, I say, on the Lord!" (Psalm 27:13, 14).

"Our soul waits for the Lord; He is our help and our shield. For our heart shall rejoice in Him, because we have trusted in His holy name. Let Your mercy, O Lord, be upon us, just as we hope in You" (Psalm 33:20-22).

Because we wait on God for justice and judgment, we do not allow ourselves to become excessively agitated about evil people: "Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for Him; do not fret because of him who prospers in his way, because of the man who brings wicked schemes to pass. Cease from anger, and forsake wrath; do not fret -- it only causes harm. For evildoers shall be cut off; but those who wait on the Lord, they shall inherit the earth" (Psalm 37:7-9).

"Do not say, 'I will recompense evil'; wait for the Lord, and He will save you" (Proverbs 20:22).

"Wait on the Lord, and keep His way, and He shall exalt you to inherit the land; when the wicked are cut off, you shall see it" (Psalm 37:34).

Even in the greatest of difficulties, we may wait for God's help: "I waited patiently for the Lord; and He inclined to me, and heard my cry. He also brought me up out of a horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock, and established my steps" (Psalm 40:1, 2).

Here David is probably speaking of difficulties resulting from sin. For our salvation we wait for God. Who else can help us? "My soul, wait silently for God alone, for my expectation is from Him. He only is my rock and my salvation; He is my defense; I shall not be moved" (Psalm 62:5,6).

We wait on God for salvation from death: "He will swallow up death forever, and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces; the rebuke of His people He will take away from all the earth; for the Lord has spoken. And it will be said in that day: 'Behold, this is our God; we have waited for Him, and He will save us. This is the Lord; we have waited for Him; we will be glad and rejoice in His salvation" (Isaiah 25:8, 9).

If we are not waiting for God, then He is waiting for us! He is waiting for use to repent so we can wait for Him: "Therefore the Lord will wait, that He may be gracious to you; and therefore He will be exalted, that He may have mercy on you. For the Lord is a God of justice; blessed are all those who wait for Him" (Isaiah 30:18).

Do not keep God waiting! If you are not yet a Christian, repent, turn to God, believe in His Son Jesus Christ, whom God sent as Savior. Confess your faith and be baptized into His body, the church, that your sins can be forgiven. If you are a Christian who does not sufficiently wait for the Lord, and that applies to us all, look to Him for sustenance and salvation from day to day and forever.

"He gives power to the weak, and to those who have no might He increases strength. Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall, but those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint" (Isaiah 40:29-31).

Let us wait for the Lord.

Roy Davison

The Scripture quotations in this article are from
The New King James Version. ©1979,1980,1982, Thomas Nelson Inc., Publishers.
Permission for reference use has been granted.

Published in The Old Paths Archive
(http://www.oldpaths.com)

Bible Reading July 1 and 2 by Gary Rose


Bible Reading  July 1 and 2

World  English  Bible


July 1

1 Kings 10-12

1Ki 10:1 When the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon concerning the name of Yahweh, she came to prove him with hard questions.

1Ki 10:2 She came to Jerusalem with a very great train, with camels that bore spices, and very much gold, and precious stones; and when she was come to Solomon, she talked with him of all that was in her heart.

1Ki 10:3 Solomon told her all her questions: there was not anything hidden from the king which he didn't tell her.

1Ki 10:4 When the queen of Sheba had seen all the wisdom of Solomon, and the house that he had built,

1Ki 10:5 and the food of his table, and the sitting of his servants, and the attendance of his ministers, and their clothing, and his cup bearers, and his ascent by which he went up to the house of Yahweh; there was no more spirit in her.

1Ki 10:6 She said to the king, It was a true report that I heard in my own land of your acts, and of your wisdom.

1Ki 10:7 However I didn't believe the words, until I came, and my eyes had seen it: and behold, the half was not told me; your wisdom and prosperity exceed the fame which I heard.

1Ki 10:8 Happy are your men, happy are these your servants, who stand continually before you, and who hear your wisdom.

1Ki 10:9 Blessed be Yahweh your God, who delighted in you, to set you on the throne of Israel: because Yahweh loved Israel forever, therefore made he you king, to do justice and righteousness.

1Ki 10:10 She gave the king one hundred twenty talents of gold, and of spices very great store, and precious stones: there came no more such abundance of spices as these which the queen of Sheba gave to king Solomon.

1Ki 10:11 The navy also of Hiram, that brought gold from Ophir, brought in from Ophir great plenty of almug trees and precious stones.

1Ki 10:12 The king made of the almug trees pillars for the house of Yahweh, and for the king's house, harps also and stringed instruments for the singers: there came no such almug trees, nor were seen, to this day.

1Ki 10:13 King Solomon gave to the queen of Sheba all her desire, whatever she asked, besides that which Solomon gave her of his royal bounty. So she turned, and went to her own land, she and her servants.

1Ki 10:14 Now the weight of gold that came to Solomon in one year was six hundred sixty-six talents of gold,

1Ki 10:15 besides that which the traders brought, and the traffic of the merchants, and of all the kings of the mixed people, and of the governors of the country.

1Ki 10:16 King Solomon made two hundred bucklers of beaten gold; six hundred shekels of gold went to one buckler.

1Ki 10:17 he made three hundred shields of beaten gold; three minas of gold went to one shield: and the king put them in the house of the forest of Lebanon.

1Ki 10:18 Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with the finest gold.

1Ki 10:19 There were six steps to the throne, and the top of the throne was round behind; and there were stays on either side by the place of the seat, and two lions standing beside the stays.

1Ki 10:20 Twelve lions stood there on the one side and on the other on the six steps: there was nothing like it made in any kingdom.

1Ki 10:21 All king Solomon's drinking vessels were of gold, and all the vessels of the house of the forest of Lebanon were of pure gold: none were of silver; it was nothing accounted of in the days of Solomon.

1Ki 10:22 For the king had at sea a navy of Tarshish with the navy of Hiram: once every three years came the navy of Tarshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks.

1Ki 10:23 So king Solomon exceeded all the kings of the earth in riches and in wisdom.

1Ki 10:24 All the earth sought the presence of Solomon, to hear his wisdom, which God had put in his heart.

1Ki 10:25 They brought every man his tribute, vessels of silver, and vessels of gold, and clothing, and armor, and spices, horses, and mules, a rate year by year.

1Ki 10:26 Solomon gathered together chariots and horsemen: and he had a thousand and four hundred chariots, and twelve thousand horsemen, that he bestowed in the chariot cities, and with the king at Jerusalem.

1Ki 10:27 The king made silver to be in Jerusalem as stones, and cedars made he to be as the sycamore trees that are in the lowland, for abundance.

1Ki 10:28 The horses which Solomon had were brought out of Egypt; and the king's merchants received them in droves, each drove at a price.

1Ki 10:29 A chariot came up and went out of Egypt for six hundred shekels of silver, and a horse for one hundred fifty; and so for all the kings of the Hittites, and for the kings of Syria, did they bring them out by their means.


1Ki 11:1 Now king Solomon loved many foreign women, together with the daughter of Pharaoh, women of the Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, Sidonians, and Hittites;

1Ki 11:2 of the nations concerning which Yahweh said to the children of Israel, You shall not go among them, neither shall they come among you; for surely they will turn away your heart after their gods: Solomon joined to these in love.

1Ki 11:3 He had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines; and his wives turned away his heart.

1Ki 11:4 For it happened, when Solomon was old, that his wives turned away his heart after other gods; and his heart was not perfect with Yahweh his God, as was the heart of David his father.

1Ki 11:5 For Solomon went after Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, and after Milcom the abomination of the Ammonites.

1Ki 11:6 Solomon did that which was evil in the sight of Yahweh, and didn't go fully after Yahweh, as did David his father.

1Ki 11:7 Then did Solomon build a high place for Chemosh the abomination of Moab, on the mountain that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech the abomination of the children of Ammon.

1Ki 11:8 So did he for all his foreign wives, who burnt incense and sacrificed to their gods.

1Ki 11:9 Yahweh was angry with Solomon, because his heart was turned away from Yahweh, the God of Israel, who had appeared to him twice,

1Ki 11:10 and had commanded him concerning this thing, that he should not go after other gods: but he didn't keep that which Yahweh commanded.

1Ki 11:11 Therefore Yahweh said to Solomon, Because this is done of you, and you have not kept my covenant and my statutes, which I have commanded you, I will surely tear the kingdom from you, and will give it to your servant.

1Ki 11:12 Notwithstanding in your days I will not do it, for David your father's sake: but I will tear it out of the hand of your son.

1Ki 11:13 However I will not tear away all the kingdom; but I will give one tribe to your son, for David my servant's sake, and for Jerusalem's sake which I have chosen.

1Ki 11:14 Yahweh raised up an adversary to Solomon, Hadad the Edomite: he was of the king's seed in Edom.

1Ki 11:15 For it happened, when David was in Edom, and Joab the captain of the army was gone up to bury the slain, and had struck every male in Edom

1Ki 11:16 (for Joab and all Israel remained there six months, until he had cut off every male in Edom);

1Ki 11:17 that Hadad fled, he and certain Edomites of his father's servants with him, to go into Egypt, Hadad being yet a little child.

1Ki 11:18 They arose out of Midian, and came to Paran; and they took men with them out of Paran, and they came to Egypt, to Pharaoh king of Egypt, who gave him a house, and appointed him food, and gave him land.

1Ki 11:19 Hadad found great favor in the sight of Pharaoh, so that he gave him as wife the sister of his own wife, the sister of Tahpenes the queen.

1Ki 11:20 The sister of Tahpenes bore him Genubath his son, whom Tahpenes weaned in Pharaoh's house; and Genubath was in Pharaoh's house among the sons of Pharaoh.

1Ki 11:21 When Hadad heard in Egypt that David slept with his fathers, and that Joab the captain of the army was dead, Hadad said to Pharaoh, Let me depart, that I may go to my own country.

1Ki 11:22 Then Pharaoh said to him, But what have you lacked with me, that behold, you seek to go to your own country? He answered, Nothing: however only let me depart.

1Ki 11:23 God raised up another adversary to him, Rezon the son of Eliada, who had fled from his lord Hadadezer king of Zobah.

1Ki 11:24 He gathered men to him, and became captain over a troop, when David killed them of Zobah: and they went to Damascus, and lived therein, and reigned in Damascus.

1Ki 11:25 He was an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon, besides the mischief that Hadad did: and he abhorred Israel, and reigned over Syria.

1Ki 11:26 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, he also lifted up his hand against the king.

1Ki 11:27 This was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king: Solomon built Millo, and repaired the breach of the city of David his father.

1Ki 11:28 The man Jeroboam was a mighty man of valor; and Solomon saw the young man that he was industrious, and he put him in charge of all the labor of the house of Joseph.

1Ki 11:29 It happened at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, that the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him in the way; now Ahijah had clad himself with a new garment; and they two were alone in the field.

1Ki 11:30 Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it in twelve pieces.

1Ki 11:31 He said to Jeroboam, Take ten pieces; for thus says Yahweh, the God of Israel, Behold, I will tear the kingdom out of the hand of Solomon, and will give ten tribes to you

1Ki 11:32 (but he shall have one tribe, for my servant David's sake and for Jerusalem's sake, the city which I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel);

1Ki 11:33 because that they have forsaken me, and have worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, Chemosh the god of Moab, and Milcom the god of the children of Ammon; and they have not walked in my ways, to do that which is right in my eyes, and to keep my statutes and my ordinances, as did David his father.

1Ki 11:34 However I will not take the whole kingdom out of his hand; but I will make him prince all the days of his life, for David my servant's sake whom I chose, who kept my commandments and my statutes;

1Ki 11:35 but I will take the kingdom out of his son's hand, and will give it to you, even ten tribes.

1Ki 11:36 To his son will I give one tribe, that David my servant may have a lamp always before me in Jerusalem, the city which I have chosen me to put my name there.

1Ki 11:37 I will take you, and you shall reign according to all that your soul desires, and shall be king over Israel.

1Ki 11:38 It shall be, if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do that which is right in my eyes, to keep my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did; that I will be with you, and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and will give Israel to you.

1Ki 11:39 I will for this afflict the seed of David, but not forever.

1Ki 11:40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam; but Jeroboam arose, and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon.

1Ki 11:41 Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, and all that he did, and his wisdom, aren't they written in the book of the acts of Solomon?

1Ki 11:42 The time that Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel was forty years.

1Ki 11:43 Solomon slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David his father: and Rehoboam his son reigned in his place.


1Ki 12:1 Rehoboam went to Shechem: for all Israel were come to Shechem to make him king.

1Ki 12:2 It happened, when Jeroboam the son of Nebat heard of it (for he was yet in Egypt, where he had fled from the presence of king Solomon, and Jeroboam lived in Egypt,

1Ki 12:3 and they sent and called him), that Jeroboam and all the assembly of Israel came, and spoke to Rehoboam, saying,

1Ki 12:4 Your father made our yoke grievous: now therefore make you the grievous service of your father, and his heavy yoke which he put on us, lighter, and we will serve you.

1Ki 12:5 He said to them, Depart yet for three days, then come again to me. The people departed.

1Ki 12:6 King Rehoboam took counsel with the old men, who had stood before Solomon his father while he yet lived, saying, What counsel do you give me to return answer to this people?

1Ki 12:7 They spoke to him, saying, If you will be a servant to this people this day, and will serve them, and answer them, and speak good words to them, then they will be your servants forever.

1Ki 12:8 But he forsook the counsel of the old men which they had given him, and took counsel with the young men who had grown up with him, who stood before him.

1Ki 12:9 He said to them, What counsel do you give, that we may return answer to this people, who have spoken to me, saying, Make the yoke that your father did put on us lighter?

1Ki 12:10 The young men who had grown up with him spoke to him, saying, Thus you shall tell this people who spoke to you, saying, Your father made our yoke heavy, but make it lighter to us; you shall say to them, My little finger is thicker than my father's waist.

1Ki 12:11 Now whereas my father burdened you with a heavy yoke, I will add to your yoke: my father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions.

1Ki 12:12 So Jeroboam and all the people came to Rehoboam the third day, as the king bade, saying, Come to me again the third day.

1Ki 12:13 The king answered the people roughly, and forsook the counsel of the old men which they had given him,

1Ki 12:14 and spoke to them after the counsel of the young men, saying, My father made your yoke heavy, but I will add to your yoke: my father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions.

1Ki 12:15 So the king didn't listen to the people; for it was a thing brought about of Yahweh, that he might establish his word, which Yahweh spoke by Ahijah the Shilonite to Jeroboam the son of Nebat.

1Ki 12:16 When all Israel saw that the king didn't listen to them, the people answered the king, saying, What portion have we in David? neither have we inheritance in the son of Jesse: to your tents, Israel: now see to your own house, David. So Israel departed to their tents.

1Ki 12:17 But as for the children of Israel who lived in the cities of Judah, Rehoboam reigned over them.

1Ki 12:18 Then king Rehoboam sent Adoram, who was over the men subject to forced labor; and all Israel stoned him to death with stones. King Rehoboam made speed to get him up to his chariot, to flee to Jerusalem.

1Ki 12:19 So Israel rebelled against the house of David to this day.

1Ki 12:20 It happened, when all Israel heard that Jeroboam was returned, that they sent and called him to the congregation, and made him king over all Israel: there was none who followed the house of David, but the tribe of Judah only.

1Ki 12:21 When Rehoboam was come to Jerusalem, he assembled all the house of Judah, and the tribe of Benjamin, a hundred and eighty thousand chosen men, who were warriors, to fight against the house of Israel, to bring the kingdom again to Rehoboam the son of Solomon.

1Ki 12:22 But the word of God came to Shemaiah the man of God, saying,

1Ki 12:23 Speak to Rehoboam the son of Solomon, king of Judah, and to all the house of Judah and Benjamin, and to the rest of the people, saying,

1Ki 12:24 Thus says Yahweh, You shall not go up, nor fight against your brothers the children of Israel: return every man to his house; for this thing is of me. So they listened to the word of Yahweh, and returned and went their way, according to the word of Yahweh.

1Ki 12:25 Then Jeroboam built Shechem in the hill country of Ephraim, and lived therein; and he went out from there, and built Penuel.

1Ki 12:26 Jeroboam said in his heart, Now will the kingdom return to the house of David:

1Ki 12:27 if this people go up to offer sacrifices in the house of Yahweh at Jerusalem, then will the heart of this people turn again to their lord, even to Rehoboam king of Judah; and they will kill me, and return to Rehoboam king of Judah.

1Ki 12:28 Whereupon the king took counsel, and made two calves of gold; and he said to them, It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem: see your gods, Israel, which brought you up out of the land of Egypt.

1Ki 12:29 He set the one in Bethel, and the other put he in Dan.

1Ki 12:30 This thing became a sin; for the people went to worship before the one, even to Dan.

1Ki 12:31 He made houses of high places, and made priests from among all the people, who were not of the sons of Levi.

1Ki 12:32 Jeroboam ordained a feast in the eighth month, on the fifteenth day of the month, like the feast that is in Judah, and he went up to the altar; so did he in Bethel, sacrificing to the calves that he had made: and he placed in Bethel the priests of the high places that he had made.

1Ki 12:33 He went up to the altar which he had made in Bethel on the fifteenth day in the eighth month, even in the month which he had devised of his own heart: and he ordained a feast for the children of Israel, and went up to the altar, to burn incense.


July 2

1 Kings 13-15

1Ki 13:1 Behold, there came a man of God out of Judah by the word of Yahweh to Beth El: and Jeroboam was standing by the altar to burn incense.

1Ki 13:2 He cried against the altar by the word of Yahweh, and said, altar, altar, thus says Yahweh: Behold, a son shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and on you shall he sacrifice the priests of the high places who burn incense on you, and men's bones shall they burn on you.

1Ki 13:3 He gave a sign the same day, saying, This is the sign which Yahweh has spoken: Behold, the altar shall be torn, and the ashes that are on it shall be poured out.

1Ki 13:4 It happened, when the king heard the saying of the man of God, which he cried against the altar in Bethel, that Jeroboam put forth his hand from the altar, saying, Lay hold on him. His hand, which he put forth against him, dried up, so that he could not draw it back again to him.

1Ki 13:5 The altar also was torn, and the ashes poured out from the altar, according to the sign which the man of God had given by the word of Yahweh.

1Ki 13:6 The king answered the man of God, Entreat now the favor of Yahweh your God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. The man of God entreated Yahweh, and the king's hand was restored him again, and became as it was before.

1Ki 13:7 The king said to the man of God, Come home with me, and refresh yourself, and I will give you a reward.

1Ki 13:8 The man of God said to the king, If you will give me half your house, I will not go in with you, neither will I eat bread nor drink water in this place;

1Ki 13:9 for so was it commanded me by the word of Yahweh, saying, You shall eat no bread, nor drink water, neither return by the way that you came.

1Ki 13:10 So he went another way, and didn't return by the way that he came to Bethel.

1Ki 13:11 Now there lived an old prophet in Bethel; and one of his sons came and told him all the works that the man of God had done that day in Bethel: the words which he had spoken to the king, them also they told to their father.

1Ki 13:12 Their father said to them, Which way did he go? Now his sons had seen which way the man of God went, who came from Judah.

1Ki 13:13 He said to his sons, Saddle me the donkey. So they saddled him the donkey; and he rode thereon.

1Ki 13:14 He went after the man of God, and found him sitting under an oak; and he said to him, Are you the man of God who came from Judah? He said, I am.

1Ki 13:15 Then he said to him, Come home with me, and eat bread.

1Ki 13:16 He said, I may not return with you, nor go in with you; neither will I eat bread nor drink water with you in this place:

1Ki 13:17 for it was said to me by the word of Yahweh, You shall eat no bread nor drink water there, nor turn again to go by the way that you came.

1Ki 13:18 He said to him, I also am a prophet as you are; and an angel spoke to me by the word of Yahweh, saying, Bring him back with you into your house, that he may eat bread and drink water. But he lied to him.

1Ki 13:19 So he went back with him, and ate bread in his house, and drank water.

1Ki 13:20 It happened, as they sat at the table, that the word of Yahweh came to the prophet who brought him back;

1Ki 13:21 and he cried to the man of God who came from Judah, saying, Thus says Yahweh, Because you have been disobedient to the mouth of Yahweh, and have not kept the commandment which Yahweh your God commanded you,

1Ki 13:22 but came back, and have eaten bread and drunk water in the place of which he said to you, Eat no bread, and drink no water; your body shall not come to the tomb of your fathers.

1Ki 13:23 It happened, after he had eaten bread, and after he had drunk, that he saddled for him the donkey, to wit, for the prophet whom he had brought back.

1Ki 13:24 When he was gone, a lion met him by the way, and killed him: and his body was cast in the way, and the donkey stood by it; the lion also stood by the body.

1Ki 13:25 Behold, men passed by, and saw the body cast in the way, and the lion standing by the body; and they came and told it in the city where the old prophet lived.

1Ki 13:26 When the prophet who brought him back from the way heard of it, he said, It is the man of God, who was disobedient to the mouth of Yahweh: therefore Yahweh has delivered him to the lion, which has torn him, and slain him, according to the word of Yahweh, which he spoke to him.

1Ki 13:27 He spoke to his sons, saying, Saddle me the donkey. They saddled it.

1Ki 13:28 He went and found his body cast in the way, and the donkey and the lion standing by the body: the lion had not eaten the body, nor torn the donkey.

1Ki 13:29 The prophet took up the body of the man of God, and laid it on the donkey, and brought it back; and he came to the city of the old prophet, to mourn, and to bury him.

1Ki 13:30 He laid his body in his own grave; and they mourned over him, saying, Alas, my brother!

1Ki 13:31 It happened, after he had buried him, that he spoke to his sons, saying, When I am dead, then bury me in the tomb in which the man of God is buried; lay my bones beside his bones.

1Ki 13:32 For the saying which he cried by the word of Yahweh against the altar in Bethel, and against all the houses of the high places which are in the cities of Samaria, shall surely happen.

1Ki 13:33 After this thing Jeroboam didn't return from his evil way, but made again from among all the people priests of the high places: whoever would, he consecrated him, that there might be priests of the high places.

1Ki 13:34 This thing became sin to the house of Jeroboam, even to cut it off, and to destroy it from off the surface of the earth.


1Ki 14:1 At that time Abijah the son of Jeroboam fell sick.

1Ki 14:2 Jeroboam said to his wife, Please get up and disguise yourself, that you not be known to be the wife of Jeroboam; and go to Shiloh: behold, there is Ahijah the prophet, who spoke concerning me that I should be king over this people.

1Ki 14:3 Take with you ten loaves, and cakes, and a jar of honey, and go to him: he will tell you what shall become of the child.

1Ki 14:4 Jeroboam's wife did so, and arose, and went to Shiloh, and came to the house of Ahijah. Now Ahijah could not see; for his eyes were set by reason of his age.

1Ki 14:5 Yahweh said to Ahijah, Behold, the wife of Jeroboam comes to inquire of you concerning her son; for he is sick: thus and thus you shall tell her; for it will be, when she comes in, that she will feign herself to be another woman.

1Ki 14:6 It was so, when Ahijah heard the sound of her feet, as she came in at the door, that he said, Come in, you wife of Jeroboam; why do you pretend to be another? for I am sent to you with heavy news.

1Ki 14:7 Go, tell Jeroboam, Thus says Yahweh, the God of Israel: Because I exalted you from among the people, and made you prince over my people Israel,

1Ki 14:8 and tore the kingdom away from the house of David, and gave it you; and yet you have not been as my servant David, who kept my commandments, and who followed me with all his heart, to do that only which was right in my eyes,

1Ki 14:9 but have done evil above all who were before you, and have gone and made you other gods, and molten images, to provoke me to anger, and have cast me behind your back:

1Ki 14:10 therefore, behold, I will bring evil on the house of Jeroboam, and will cut off from Jeroboam everyone who urinates on a wall, him who is shut up and him who is left at large in Israel, and will utterly sweep away the house of Jeroboam, as a man sweeps away dung, until it be all gone.

1Ki 14:11 Him who dies of Jeroboam in the city shall the dogs eat; and him who dies in the field shall the birds of the sky eat: for Yahweh has spoken it.

1Ki 14:12 Arise therefore, go to your house: and when your feet enter into the city, the child shall die.

1Ki 14:13 All Israel shall mourn for him, and bury him; for he only of Jeroboam shall come to the grave, because in him there is found some good thing toward Yahweh, the God of Israel, in the house of Jeroboam.

1Ki 14:14 Moreover Yahweh will raise him up a king over Israel, who shall cut off the house of Jeroboam that day: but what? even now.

1Ki 14:15 For Yahweh will strike Israel, as a reed is shaken in the water; and he will root up Israel out of this good land which he gave to their fathers, and will scatter them beyond the River, because they have made their Asherim, provoking Yahweh to anger.

1Ki 14:16 He will give Israel up because of the sins of Jeroboam, which he has sinned, and with which he has made Israel to sin.

1Ki 14:17 Jeroboam's wife arose, and departed, and came to Tirzah: and as she came to the threshold of the house, the child died.

1Ki 14:18 All Israel buried him, and mourned for him, according to the word of Yahweh, which he spoke by his servant Ahijah the prophet.

1Ki 14:19 The rest of the acts of Jeroboam, how he warred, and how he reigned, behold, they are written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel.

1Ki 14:20 The days which Jeroboam reigned were two and twenty years: and he slept with his fathers, and Nadab his son reigned in his place.

1Ki 14:21 Rehoboam the son of Solomon reigned in Judah. Rehoboam was forty-one years old when he began to reign, and he reigned seventeen years in Jerusalem, the city which Yahweh had chosen out of all the tribes of Israel, to put his name there: and his mother's name was Naamah the Ammonitess.

1Ki 14:22 Judah did that which was evil in the sight of Yahweh, and they provoked him to jealousy with their sins which they committed, above all that their fathers had done.

1Ki 14:23 For they also built them high places, and pillars, and Asherim, on every high hill, and under every green tree;

1Ki 14:24 and there were also sodomites in the land: they did according to all the abominations of the nations which Yahweh drove out before the children of Israel.

1Ki 14:25 It happened in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, that Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem;

1Ki 14:26 and he took away the treasures of the house of Yahweh, and the treasures of the king's house; he even took away all: and he took away all the shields of gold which Solomon had made.

1Ki 14:27 King Rehoboam made in their place shields of brass, and committed them to the hands of the captains of the guard, who kept the door of the king's house.

1Ki 14:28 It was so, that as often as the king went into the house of Yahweh, the guard bore them, and brought them back into the guard chamber.

1Ki 14:29 Now the rest of the acts of Rehoboam, and all that he did, aren't they written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?

1Ki 14:30 There was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam continually.

1Ki 14:31 Rehoboam slept with his fathers, and was buried with his fathers in the city of David: and his mother's name was Naamah the Ammonitess. Abijam his son reigned in his place.


1Ki 15:1 Now in the eighteenth year of king Jeroboam the son of Nebat began Abijam to reign over Judah.

1Ki 15:2 Three years reigned he in Jerusalem: and his mother's name was Maacah the daughter of Abishalom.

1Ki 15:3 He walked in all the sins of his father, which he had done before him; and his heart was not perfect with Yahweh his God, as the heart of David his father.

1Ki 15:4 Nevertheless for David's sake did Yahweh his God give him a lamp in Jerusalem, to set up his son after him, and to establish Jerusalem;

1Ki 15:5 because David did that which was right in the eyes of Yahweh, and didn't turn aside from anything that he commanded him all the days of his life, except only in the matter of Uriah the Hittite.

1Ki 15:6 Now there was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam all the days of his life.

1Ki 15:7 The rest of the acts of Abijam, and all that he did, aren't they written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah? There was war between Abijam and Jeroboam.

1Ki 15:8 Abijam slept with his fathers; and they buried him in the city of David: and Asa his son reigned in his place.

1Ki 15:9 In the twentieth year of Jeroboam king of Israel began Asa to reign over Judah.

1Ki 15:10 Forty-one years reigned he in Jerusalem: and his mother's name was Maacah the daughter of Abishalom.

1Ki 15:11 Asa did that which was right in the eyes of Yahweh, as did David his father.

1Ki 15:12 He put away the sodomites out of the land, and removed all the idols that his fathers had made.

1Ki 15:13 Also Maacah his mother he removed from being queen, because she had made an abominable image for an Asherah; and Asa cut down her image, and burnt it at the brook Kidron.

1Ki 15:14 But the high places were not taken away: nevertheless the heart of Asa was perfect with Yahweh all his days.

1Ki 15:15 He brought into the house of Yahweh the things that his father had dedicated, and the things that himself had dedicated, silver, and gold, and vessels.

1Ki 15:16 There was war between Asa and Baasha king of Israel all their days.

1Ki 15:17 Baasha king of Israel went up against Judah, and built Ramah, that he might not allow anyone to go out or come in to Asa king of Judah.

1Ki 15:18 Then Asa took all the silver and the gold that were left in the treasures of the house of Yahweh, and the treasures of the king's house, and delivered them into the hand of his servants; and king Asa sent them to Ben Hadad, the son of Tabrimmon, the son of Hezion, king of Syria, who lived at Damascus, saying,

1Ki 15:19 There is a treaty between me and you, between my father and your father: behold, I have sent to you a present of silver and gold; go, break your treaty with Baasha king of Israel, that he may depart from me.

1Ki 15:20 Ben Hadad listened to king Asa, and sent the captains of his armies against the cities of Israel, and struck Ijon, and Dan, and Abel Beth Maacah, and all Chinneroth, with all the land of Naphtali.

1Ki 15:21 It happened, when Baasha heard of it, that he left off building Ramah, and lived in Tirzah.

1Ki 15:22 Then king Asa made a proclamation to all Judah; none was exempted: and they carried away the stones of Ramah, and its timber, with which Baasha had built; and king Asa built therewith Geba of Benjamin, and Mizpah.

1Ki 15:23 Now the rest of all the acts of Asa, and all his might, and all that he did, and the cities which he built, aren't they written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah? But in the time of his old age he was diseased in his feet.

1Ki 15:24 Asa slept with his fathers, and was buried with his fathers in the city of David his father; and Jehoshaphat his son reigned in his place.

1Ki 15:25 Nadab the son of Jeroboam began to reign over Israel in the second year of Asa king of Judah; and he reigned over Israel two years.

1Ki 15:26 He did that which was evil in the sight of Yahweh, and walked in the way of his father, and in his sin with which he made Israel to sin.

1Ki 15:27 Baasha the son of Ahijah, of the house of Issachar, conspired against him; and Baasha struck him at Gibbethon, which belonged to the Philistines; for Nadab and all Israel were laying siege to Gibbethon.

1Ki 15:28 Even in the third year of Asa king of Judah did Baasha kill him, and reigned in his place.

1Ki 15:29 It happened that, as soon as he was king, he struck all the house of Jeroboam: he didn't leave to Jeroboam any who breathed, until he had destroyed him; according to the saying of Yahweh, which he spoke by his servant Ahijah the Shilonite;

1Ki 15:30 for the sins of Jeroboam which he sinned, and with which he made Israel to sin, because of his provocation with which he provoked Yahweh, the God of Israel, to anger.

1Ki 15:31 Now the rest of the acts of Nadab, and all that he did, aren't they written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

1Ki 15:32 There was war between Asa and Baasha king of Israel all their days.

1Ki 15:33 In the third year of Asa king of Judah began Baasha the son of Ahijah to reign over all Israel in Tirzah, and reigned twenty-four years.

1Ki 15:34 He did that which was evil in the sight of Yahweh, and walked in the way of Jeroboam, and in his sin with which he made Israel to sin.

Jul. 1

Acts 3

Act 3:1 Peter and John were going up into the temple at the hour of prayer, the ninth hour.

Act 3:2 A certain man who was lame from his mother's womb was being carried, whom they laid daily at the door of the temple which is called Beautiful, to ask gifts for the needy of those who entered into the temple.

Act 3:3 Seeing Peter and John about to go into the temple, he asked to receive gifts for the needy.

Act 3:4 Peter, fastening his eyes on him, with John, said, "Look at us."

Act 3:5 He listened to them, expecting to receive something from them.

Act 3:6 But Peter said, "Silver and gold have I none, but what I have, that I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, get up and walk!"

Act 3:7 He took him by the right hand, and raised him up. Immediately his feet and his ankle bones received strength.

Act 3:8 Leaping up, he stood, and began to walk. He entered with them into the temple, walking, leaping, and praising God.

Act 3:9 All the people saw him walking and praising God.

Act 3:10 They recognized him, that it was he who used to sit begging for gifts for the needy at the Beautiful Gate of the temple. They were filled with wonder and amazement at what had happened to him.

Act 3:11 As the lame man who was healed held on to Peter and John, all the people ran together to them in the porch that is called Solomon's, greatly wondering.

Act 3:12 When Peter saw it, he responded to the people, "You men of Israel, why do you marvel at this man? Why do you fasten your eyes on us, as though by our own power or godliness we had made him walk?

Act 3:13 The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the God of our fathers, has glorified his Servant Jesus, whom you delivered up, and denied in the presence of Pilate, when he had determined to release him.

Act 3:14 But you denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you,

Act 3:15 and killed the Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead, to which we are witnesses.

Act 3:16 By faith in his name, his name has made this man strong, whom you see and know. Yes, the faith which is through him has given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all.

Act 3:17 "Now, brothers, I know that you did this in ignorance, as did also your rulers.

Act 3:18 But the things which God announced by the mouth of all his prophets, that Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled.

Act 3:19 "Repent therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out, so that there may come times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord,

Act 3:20 and that he may send Christ Jesus, who was ordained for you before,

Act 3:21 whom heaven must receive until the times of restoration of all things, which God spoke long ago by the mouth of his holy prophets.

Act 3:22 For Moses indeed said to the fathers, 'The Lord God will raise up a prophet for you from among your brothers, like me. You shall listen to him in all things whatever he says to you.

Act 3:23 It will be, that every soul that will not listen to that prophet will be utterly destroyed from among the people.'

Act 3:24 Yes, and all the prophets from Samuel and those who followed after, as many as have spoken, they also told of these days.

Act 3:25 You are the children of the prophets, and of the covenant which God made with our fathers, saying to Abraham, 'In your seed will all the families of the earth be blessed.'

Act 3:26 God, having raised up his servant, Jesus, sent him to you first, to bless you, in turning away everyone of you from your wickedness."


Jul. 2

Acts 4

Act 4:1 As they spoke to the people, the priests and the captain of the temple and the Sadducees came to them,

Act 4:2 being upset because they taught the people and proclaimed in Jesus the resurrection from the dead.

Act 4:3 They laid hands on them, and put them in custody until the next day, for it was now evening.

Act 4:4 But many of those who heard the word believed, and the number of the men came to be about five thousand.

Act 4:5 It happened in the morning, that their rulers, elders, and scribes were gathered together in Jerusalem.

Act 4:6 Annas the high priest was there, with Caiaphas, John, Alexander, and as many as were relatives of the high priest.

Act 4:7 When they had stood them in the middle of them, they inquired, "By what power, or in what name, have you done this?"

Act 4:8 Then Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, said to them, "You rulers of the people, and elders of Israel,

Act 4:9 if we are examined today concerning a good deed done to a crippled man, by what means this man has been healed,

Act 4:10 be it known to you all, and to all the people of Israel, that in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, in him does this man stand here before you whole.

Act 4:11 He is 'the stone which was regarded as worthless by you, the builders, which has become the head of the corner.'

Act 4:12 There is salvation in none other, for neither is there any other name under heaven, that is given among men, by which we must be saved!"

Act 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and had perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marveled. They recognized that they had been with Jesus.

Act 4:14 Seeing the man who was healed standing with them, they could say nothing against it.

Act 4:15 But when they had commanded them to go aside out of the council, they conferred among themselves,

Act 4:16 saying, "What shall we do to these men? Because indeed a notable miracle has been done through them, as can be plainly seen by all who dwell in Jerusalem, and we can't deny it.

Act 4:17 But so that this spreads no further among the people, let's threaten them, that from now on they don't speak to anyone in this name."

Act 4:18 They called them, and commanded them not to speak at all nor teach in the name of Jesus.

Act 4:19 But Peter and John answered them, "Whether it is right in the sight of God to listen to you rather than to God, judge for yourselves,

Act 4:20 for we can't help telling the things which we saw and heard."

Act 4:21 When they had further threatened them, they let them go, finding no way to punish them, because of the people; for everyone glorified God for that which was done.

Act 4:22 For the man on whom this miracle of healing was performed was more than forty years old.

Act 4:23 Being let go, they came to their own company, and reported all that the chief priests and the elders had said to them.

Act 4:24 When they heard it, they lifted up their voice to God with one accord, and said, "O Lord, you are God, who made the heaven, the earth, the sea, and all that is in them;

Act 4:25 who by the mouth of your servant, David, said, 'Why do the nations rage, and the peoples plot a vain thing?

Act 4:26 The kings of the earth take a stand, and the rulers take council together, against the Lord, and against his Christ.'

Act 4:27 "For truly, in this city against your holy servant, Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles and the people of Israel, were gathered together

Act 4:28 to do whatever your hand and your council foreordained to happen.

Act 4:29 Now, Lord, look at their threats, and grant to your servants to speak your word with all boldness,

Act 4:30 while you stretch out your hand to heal; and that signs and wonders may be done through the name of your holy Servant Jesus."

Act 4:31 When they had prayed, the place was shaken where they were gathered together. They were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and they spoke the word of God with boldness.

Act 4:32 The multitude of those who believed were of one heart and soul. Not one of them claimed that anything of the things which he possessed was his own, but they had all things in common.

Act 4:33 With great power, the apostles gave their testimony of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus. Great grace was on them all.

Act 4:34 For neither was there among them any who lacked, for as many as were owners of lands or houses sold them, and brought the proceeds of the things that were sold,

Act 4:35 and laid them at the apostles' feet, and distribution was made to each, according as anyone had need.

Act 4:36 Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas (which is, being interpreted, Son of Encouragement), a Levite, a man of Cyprus by race,

Act 4:37 having a field, sold it, and brought the money and laid it at the apostles' feet.