10/26/13

From Ben Fronczek... Thanksgiving or Giving-thanks 2011

Thanksgiving or Giving-thanks 2011

I have to admit, Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. But as I think about its origin I have to admit, I am amazed at the backdrop of the first Thanksgiving celebration. For one thing, it really emerges out of a time extreme emotional pain and suffering. History tells us that more than half of the 100 plus pilgrims who arrived on the Mayflower in November of 1620 were dead by the first Thanksgiving a year later. “The great sickness,” as it was called, was probably a combination of scurvy from the ocean crossing, typhus, and pneumonia. Among the adult males, only 16 of the original 38 survived. For adult women, there were 11 survivors out of 27. Here’s how Governor Bradford told it: “So they died sometimes 2 or 3 a day, and of the 100 odd persons, scarce 50 remained. And of these, in the time of most distress, there was but 6 or 7 sound persons who, to their great commendations be it spoke, spared no pains, night or day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health, fetched them wood, made them fires, dressed their meat, washed their loathsome clothes, clothed and unclothed them — in a word, did all the homely and necessary offices for them which dainty and queasy stomachs cannot endure here to be named.” Bradford also makes it clear that without the help of the local Indians, the pilgrims would never have made it to the first Thanksgiving. They generously shared food with the English settlers during the first winter and then showed them how to plant and cultivate corn the next spring and summer. Luckily the first harvest was a generous one. A three day feast was planned in late November, and the pilgrims invited the Indian chief  and his people. 90 native Americans arrived with 5 deer to eat, in addition to the wild turkeys, fish, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, squash, and  beetroot that the Englishmen had prepared. Can you imagine the mix of emotions that must have been present at that first Thanksgiving. Everyone  of those early settlers had reason to be grieving, having been ravaged by disease and despair, and having lived in freezing, filthy huts the first winter, watching half the people they knew and loved die in their arms. Imagine the spiritual strength it must have taken, after all the hardships and horrors they had to endure. There they celebrated and were positive and even were hospitable despite their recent losses.

Bradford wrote in his history of that first Thanksgiving: “Although it may not always be so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish others partake of our plenty.”
Now how’s that for a Thanksgiving vision: these devastated pilgrims saying that “by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish others partake of our plenty.”  

 It seems to me that mankind has this inherit need or desire at some point to give thanks, feel gratitude, and even celebrate even if we go through a season of great suffering.  We see examples of this throughout history, and we see example of this in the Bible. But why? Why do we have this need? I personally think it comes down to this: Because even though our lives may not be perfect and we experience trouble, sorrow, disasters, sickness, and hardship on every side, God has designed us where we can only go so long without feeling a sense of hope, or faith that something better just might be around the corner.  And despite our troubles and hardships, a spirit of thanksgiving emerges for what blessings that we do have and is also in part a celebration of faith and what is yet to come. 

The Apostle Paul wrote some amazing verses in Philippians 4:4-9, he instructed the early Christian who had begun to suffer for their faith in Christ,  

“Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near.  Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.  Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me–put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.”

As Paul instructs the early Christians here (and just to remind you, he writing this from prison) he writes:

‘May your gentleness be evident to all, ‘   and ‘rejoice in the Lord always’ (always)  Why?

For one reason the Lord is near. He’s closer than you realized. We may not be able to see Him with these eyes of flesh, but you are never out of His sight.   Paul wanted his readers to find comfort in that fact.  No matter how bad things may get, whether you are sick, afraid, lonely, or even trapped in a prison cell, God is close by and can hear every whisper and prayer you make. And so he writes do not worry,  & don’t be anxious.    Don’t let anxiety get the best of you, rather,  reach out to your Father.  Go to Him in prayer, even petition Him with a spirit of thanksgiving (because He does love you and He is close by). Ask Him what you need to ask. And he goes on to say that if you believe and trust in your Father God that much, His peace, a peace which He offers,  which transcends all human understanding, will guard your heart and mind in Jesus. That faith, that trust, that spirit of thanksgiving  will comfort you on the coldest of nights.’

I came across an interesting article on the internet written by Sharon Carroll, it was part of a speech she made to a group in Singapore. It goes like this.

“There have been many times this past year when I was anything but thankful. In fact, on a number of occasions I was often stunned, confused, and downright angry with God, wondering where He was in the midst of the most difficult trials in my life.
A year ago I got the shocking phone call that my younger brother had committed suicide, leaving behind his wife and two precious children. Six months later another one of those phone calls came, this time in the middle of the night, with the news that my older brother had suddenly died of a heart attack at the age of 48-leaving his four children (aged between 8 and 21) without their father. Both deaths came out of nowhere and left me devastated. I was now the only sibling left in my family. I found myself often crying out, “Lord, where are you?”All that only made the next bit of news even harder to take. Two weeks after I returned to Singapore from my older brother’s funeral I found a lump in my breast. After the biopsy, the doctor informed me that the lump was malignant. I had cancer. I can still remember the knot I felt in my stomach when the doctor told me this. It was the day before my 45th birthday. My first thoughts were for my husband and my children. Would I live to see Kimberly graduate from high school next year-and Chris 3 years later?Would I get to grow old with Charles, my wonderful husband of these past 21 years? And what about my Mother? How could she take another blow? These and many other thoughts and questions played havoc with my emotions during those difficult days six months ago.But, I soon found encouragement and strength in the God I gave my life to so many years ago. He had always been faithful through previous trials, and I discovered afresh that He would not let me down in my hour of greatest need. My heavenly Father, through the promises of His Word, gave me a deep sense of peace.

For example, in Isaiah 49:16 He says,

“See! I will not forget you . . . I have carved you on the palm of my hand.” And in Jeremiah 29:11 He says, For I know the plans I have for you . . . they are plans for good and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

With these promises I found the strength to face the days ahead-surgery (a partial mastectomy), the further diagnosis that my cancer was a very aggressive kind, that it was 3rd stage (that is, that the malignant cells had already spread into the blood stream), the powerful doses of chemotherapy-10 sessions in all-along with all sorts of weird effects on my body, weakness, nausea, the loss of my hair-that was probably the hardest part of all. And now, 31 sessions of radiation-to be completed by Christmas.  

Through it all, I can honestly come to this Thanksgiving Day and say, “Thank you, Lord,” for He has taught me many valuable lessons through the storms of this past year:

1)That life is short-don’t waste any of it.

2) That people, especially our families and friends, are special. Don’t take them for granted.

3) That we have a choice in life, as to how we will respond to adversity-either we choose to feel sorry for ourselves and call ourselves “victims,” or we choose to overcome and be a “victor.”

4) That the trials will serve to either make us bitter-or better.

5) That faith in God-and trusting in Him-is the key to it all.

6) And that an “attitude of gratitude” is always better than having a “pity-party.” 

As American author and humorist Barbara Johnson reminds us in the title of her book, Pain is Inevitable, but Misery is Optional.
I want to take this opportunity to thank all who stood with me and encouraged me with their words, prayers, and many expressions of love: my own family, my fellow church members, my colleagues at SAS, and my friends in the community.
Most of all, I want to thank my Lord Jesus Christ, who has touched me and healed me. After a series of extensive tests two weeks ago, my oncologist told me that at this point she could find no trace of cancer in my body. While she cannot give me complete medical clearance for three years due to the nature of my illness, I believe God has indeed healed me and set me free from the curse of death.

On that first Thanksgiving Day, more than 370 years ago, the early pilgrims stood in the snow of a bitter winter and paused to give thanks to God. They chose to look beyond the difficulties of their surroundings and circumstances and put their eyes on the Lord God Almighty, the Alpha and the Omega, the Author and Finisher of the Faith-believing firmly that He who began a good work in them was able to complete it. In all reality, that first Thanksgiving was a declaration of faith-that God’s faithfulness in the past would see them through to a glorious future. And that’s exactly what happened. A great nation was established in the years ahead.

Today, on the eve of yet another Thanksgiving Day, years later and a world away from the early pilgrims, I want to join in the spirit of our forefathers and give thanks to God. The circumstances, if I chose to focus on them, are not so great. I don’t always feel so good. I get tired easily. My hair is shorter than my son’s. My brothers are gone and their families are still trying to pick up the shattered pieces of their lives. But, this Thanksgiving Day, I choose to praise God. His grace has been sufficient. He has touched me and healed me. He has given me life-abundant and eternal-and with it the promise of heaven. One day, I will be reunited with my brothers. One day, I will be given a new body. One day, I will see my Savior face to face, and He will wipe away every tear and take away every pain. That’s why I rejoice tonight. That’s why I can truly wish you a “Happy Thanksgiving.”

Psalm 75:1, says, “We thank you, O God! We give thanks because you are near.”

Psalm 107:1, says Oh give thanks to the LORD, for He is good,  For His loving kindness is everlasting.”

My challenge this week is let that thankful spirit surface in you. Make a effort to be thankful for something every day. And if you want that peace of God that the apostle Paul talked about, I also challenge you to do what he said,  

“Rejoice in the Lord always.  Remember that the Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”

From Jim McGuiggan... All Israel will be saved (1)

All Israel will be saved (1)





This much-debated verse is central to Paul's Romans 9—11 defense of God's faithfulness to his promises to ethnic Israel. He doesn't say all Israel "can" be saved. He doesn't say all Israel "might" be saved. He doesn't say all Israel "should" be saved and he certainly doesn't say all Israel "won't" be saved. He says all Israel "will" be saved. He doesn't say "all Christians" will be saved but all "Israel" will be saved.

He says "Israel" rather than "Christian" because it's Israel that's at the heart of the "problem" with his gospel. He says "Israel" because it's part of Israel that has been hardened. He says "Israel" rather than "Christian" because the Gentile arrogance he wants to rebuke is directed toward Israel. Gentiles were feeling and maybe saying that God had dumped ethnic Israel and replaced it with a new Gentile people (11:19). Gentile arrogance made it appear that God had permanently jettisoned physical Jews (but see 11:28-29) and this would have been unfaithfulness on God's part. Paul says "Israel" because it was to Israel that God made promises (be sure to read Romans 9:1-5) and it's Israel that's on the outside looking in at the party. When he says all "Israel" Paul has ethnic Jews in mind. We'll return to this later but you might want to look at Paul's use of the terms Israel and Jew.

When he says "all" Israel will be saved does he mean all without exception? Judas, Caiaphas included? If he is sure that absolutely every single Jew will be saved then his anguish is inexplicable and his claim that he would be willing to be cut off from Christ if he thought it would save Israel is hypocritical (see 9:1-3). Most people are sure that his "all" is not an absolute. It isn't difficult to find texts in the OT where "all Israel" doesn't mean every single person in the nation. In using "all", texts like that suggest "a sufficiently significant number" of Israelites that represents the nation at that time.

So is that what Paul means when he says "all" Israel will be saved? That wouldn't help us much. If he means a significant number of Israel will be saved, does he mean a significant number of Israel out of the number of Israelites since the days of the patriarchs until now? Does he mean a significant number of some coming generation of Israelites? And bearing in mind that he's defending God's faithfulness to his promises to Jews why won't all Jews without exception be saved if God made promises to them? Some people are certain that sometime in the future (the near future, many of them say), just before Jesus returns, there will be a mass conversion of Jews. They tell us that that will be the fulfillment of "and so all Israel will be saved."

So it comes down to that does it? Back in the first century Paul defends God's righteousness and faithfulness in the face of hosts of lost Jews and how does he do it? By saying that a large number from a generation in the 21st century will come to Christ? Did God make no promises to the Jews between the 1st century and now? Imagine a delegation of non-believing Jews saying to Paul, "In light of your 'gospel' God has been faithless to us Jews because according to you so many of us are unsaved." And imagine Paul saying, "No he isn't unfaithful, and the proof of his faithfulness will take place about 2,000 years from now when a significant number of Jews will turn to Christ." Or imagine a delegation of arrogant, ignorant Gentiles saying to Paul, "God is done with the Jews because he has hardened them to bring us in." And imagine Paul saying, "No, the proof that God is not done with the Jews is when, after 2,000 years of hardening them in unbelief, God will bring a significant number of Israel to faith in Christ in the generation just before Christ's coming."

I don't think that that's what Paul had in mind.

©2004 Jim McGuiggan. All materials are free to be copied and used as long as money is not being made.

Many thanks to brother Ed Healy, for allowing me to post from his website, the abiding word.com.

From Mark Copeland... Rejoice In The Lord Always! (Philippians 4:4)






                    "THE EPISTLE TO THE PHILIPPIANS"

                    Rejoice In The Lord Always! (4:4)

INTRODUCTION

1. In the final chapter of Philippians, we find Paul giving exhortations
   that are both specific and general in nature...
   a. We saw in verses 1-3 where Paul gave specific exhortations to
      individuals there at Philippi
   b. Now in verse 4, we find the first of several exhortations which
      are certainly needful for all Christians:
      
        "Rejoice in the Lord always.  Again I will say, rejoice!"

2. You may recall that "joy" is the keynote of this epistle
   a. No less than sixteen times in this epistle, Paul uses the word or
      a derivation of it!
   b. Cf. Php 1:4,18(twice),25; 2:2,17(twice),18(twice),28,29; 3:1;
      4:1,4(twice),10

3. In this study, I will share a few observations about how we are to
   "Rejoice In The Lord Always!"

[First, notice that...]

I. THIS JOY IS TO BE EXPERIENCED "ALWAYS"

   A. NOT JUST AN OCCASIONAL EXPERIENCE, FOR EXCEPTIONAL PEOPLE...
      1. But in darkness as well as in light; in trials as well as in
         triumphs - cf. Jm 1:2-3; Ro 5:3-4
      2. Not just for apostles, but for all Christians - cf. Jm 1:2-3;
         1Pe 4:12-13

   B. CONSIDER THE EXAMPLE OF PAUL, WHO FOUND JOY "ALWAYS"...
      1. In his prayers - Php 1:4
      2. In the proclamation of the gospel under adverse circumstances 
         - Php 1:18
      3. In the unity of the saints - Php 2:2
      4. In the prospect of being a martyr for Christ - Php 2:17 
      5. In the love of the brethren - Php 4:10

[Truly Paul rejoiced "always"!  But what was his secret?  What was the
source of this abiding joy?]

II. THIS ABIDING JOY IS FOUND "IN THE LORD"

   A. THERE MAY BE "TEMPORARY" JOY...
      1. In drugs (including alcohol and tobacco)
      2. In sexual pleasures (whether lawful or unlawful)
      3. In material acquisitions
      -- But these are at best like riches, which "make themselves wings;
         they fly away like an eagle toward heaven" (Pr 23:5); and at
         worst, are "the passing pleasures of sin" (He 11:25)

   B. BUT THE JOY THAT "ABIDES" IS ONLY "IN THE LORD"...
      1. I.e., that which comes from a personal, living and fruitful
         relationship with the Lord
      2. For "in the Lord" we enjoy:
         a. Peace with God - Ro 5:2
         b. Help in temptations - 1Co 10:13; Php 4:13
         c. Assurance of God's companionship in time of trial - He 13:5-6
      3. These are the sort of things which provide a true and lasting
         joy

[Wouldn't it be wonderful to be able to experience this "abiding joy"?  
Well, why don't we?  Why do many of those who have a personal 
relationship with the Lord often find themselves lacking joy in all 
circumstances?

Perhaps it is because...]

III. THERE ARE OFTEN HINDRANCES TO "ABIDING JOY"

   A. MEMORIES OF PAST FAILURES; AWARENESS OF PRESENT FAULTS...
      1. Such often leaves people in a state of discouragement or
         depression
      2. Paul, however, provides the solution in Php 3:12-14
         a. Realize your imperfection, yet press on to better things!
         b. Forget your past failures, reach forward to future successes!

   B. NATURAL TEMPERAMENT OR DISPOSITION...
      1. Many people are naturally "melancholy"
         a. Through genetic predisposition toward such an attitude
         b. Or through environmental influences as we were growing up
      2. Yet in Christ, we can be transformed (Ro 12:1-2) and produce
         the "fruit of the Spirit" which includes "joy" - Ga 5:22

   C. DEPRESSING CIRCUMSTANCES...
      1. It is easy to be joyful when everything is going well, but when
         things wrong, well...
      2. However, we see from the Scriptures that even those times can
         be a time for rejoicing if we have the right "perspective" 
         - Jm 1:2-4

   D. SYMPATHY WITH OTHERS...
      1. Certainly, a compassionate heart cannot be untouched by the
         hardships of others - cf. Ro 12:15
      2. And yet, properly spoken words of comfort and counsel can
         provide a joyful reprieve from the hardships others bear - cf.
         Pr 16:24

CONCLUSION

1. "Rejoice in the Lord always"...
   a. Does not mean one is to be insensitive to the harsh realities of
      life
   b. But it does mean that one does not let the dark realities of life
      blind him to the radiance of joy that is found in the Lord!

2. Have you found yourself going through life without the "abiding joy"
   discussed in our text, that joy which Peter himself defines as
   "inexpressible" (1Pe 1:8)?

3. If so, then make your relationship with the Lord what it ought to
   be...
   a. First by rendering complete obedience to His Will
   b. And then by letting the counsel of His Spririt-given Word give you
      the perspectives necessary to "Rejoice In The Lord Always!"

Executable Outlines, Copyright © Mark A. Copeland, 2011

From Gary.... Bible Reading and Study October 26




Bible Reading and Study  


October 26


The World English Bible



Oct. 26
Song of Solomon 7, 8

Son 7:1 How beautiful are your feet in sandals, prince's daughter! Your rounded thighs are like jewels, the work of the hands of a skillful workman.
Son 7:2 Your body is like a round goblet, no mixed wine is wanting. Your waist is like a heap of wheat, set about with lilies.
Son 7:3 Your two breasts are like two fawns, that are twins of a roe.
Son 7:4 Your neck is like an ivory tower. Your eyes are like the pools in Heshbon by the gate of Bathrabbim. Your nose is like the tower of Lebanon which looks toward Damascus.
Son 7:5 Your head on you is like Carmel. The hair of your head like purple. The king is held captive in its tresses.
Son 7:6 How beautiful and how pleasant you are, love, for delights!
Son 7:7 This, your stature, is like a palm tree, your breasts like its fruit.
Son 7:8 I said, "I will climb up into the palm tree. I will take hold of its fruit." Let your breasts be like clusters of the vine, the smell of your breath like apples, Beloved
Son 7:9 Your mouth like the best wine, that goes down smoothly for my beloved, gliding through the lips of those who are asleep.
Son 7:10 I am my beloved's. His desire is toward me.
Son 7:11 Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field. Let us lodge in the villages.
Son 7:12 Let's go early up to the vineyards. Let's see whether the vine has budded, its blossom is open, and the pomegranates are in flower. There I will give you my love.
Son 7:13 The mandrakes give forth fragrance. At our doors are all kinds of precious fruits, new and old, which I have stored up for you, my beloved.
Son 8:1 Oh that you were like my brother, who sucked the breasts of my mother! If I found you outside, I would kiss you; yes, and no one would despise me.
Son 8:2 I would lead you, bringing you into my mother's house, who would instruct me. I would have you drink spiced wine, of the juice of my pomegranate.
Son 8:3 His left hand would be under my head. His right hand would embrace me.
Son 8:4 I adjure you, daughters of Jerusalem, that you not stir up, nor awaken love, until it so desires. Friends
Son 8:5 Who is this who comes up from the wilderness, leaning on her beloved? Under the apple tree I aroused you. There your mother conceived you. There she was in labor and bore you.
Son 8:6 Set me as a seal on your heart, as a seal on your arm; for love is strong as death. Jealousy is as cruel as Sheol. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a very flame of Yahweh.
Son 8:7 Many waters can't quench love, neither can floods drown it. If a man would give all the wealth of his house for love, he would be utterly scorned. Friends
Son 8:8 We have a little sister. She has no breasts. What shall we do for our sister in the day when she is to be spoken for?
Son 8:9 If she is a wall, we will build on her a turret of silver. if she is a door, we will enclose her with boards of cedar. Beloved
Son 8:10 I am a wall, and my breasts like towers, then I was in his eyes like one who found peace.
Son 8:11 Solomon had a vineyard at Baal Hamon. He leased out the vineyard to keepers. Each was to bring a thousand shekels of silver for its fruit.
Son 8:12 My own vineyard is before me. The thousand are for you, Solomon; two hundred for those who tend its fruit. Lover
Son 8:13 You who dwell in the gardens, with friends in attendance, let me hear your voice! Beloved
Son 8:14 Come away, my beloved! Be like a gazelle or a young stag on the mountains of spices! 


 
The Composite Bible
The World English Bible
Darby's Translation
Young's Literal Translation

The Composite Bible is a effort to understand the Bible by considering it from different perspectives and different levels of literalcy. First, read the World English Bible (the least literal-black text) for comprehension of the text. Next, read both the World English Bible with the Darby Translation (more literal-blue text)to make comparisons and lastly, read all three versions (Young's is the most literal translation- red text) at one time to obtain an overview of the text. Doing this will make you think about what the Scriptures are actually saying and avoid reading in a superficial manner.
Song of Solomon
Song of Solomon 7 1
How beautiful are your feet in sandals, prince`s daughter! Your rounded thighs are like
jewels, The work of the hands of a skillful workman.
How beautiful are thy footsteps in sandals, O prince`s daughter! The roundings of thy
thighs are like jewels, The work of the hands of an artist.
As the chorus of `Mahanaim.` How beautiful were thy feet with sandals, O
daughter of Nadib. The turnings of thy sides [are] as ornaments, Work of the hands
of an artificer.
Song of Solomon 7 2
Your body is like a round goblet, No mingled wine is wanting. Your waist is like a heap of
wheat, Set about with lilies.
Thy navel is a round goblet, [which] wanteth not mixed wine; Thy belly a heap of wheat,
set about with lilies;
Thy waist [is] a basin of roundness, It lacketh not the mixture, Thy body a heap of
wheat, fenced with lilies,
Song of Solomon 7 3
Your two breasts are like two fawns, That are twins of a roe.
Thy two breasts are like two fawns, twins of a gazelle;
Thy two breasts as two young ones, twins of a roe,
Song of Solomon 7 4
Your neck is like an ivory tower. Your eyes are like the pools in Heshbon by the gate of Bath-rabbim; Your nose is like the tower of Lebanon which looks toward Damascus.
Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; Thine eyes, [like] the pools in Heshbon, By the gate of
Bath-rabbim; Thy nose like the tower of Lebanon, Which looketh toward Damascus;
Thy neck as a tower of the ivory, Thine eyes pools in Heshbon, near the gate of
Bath-Rabbim, Thy face as a tower of Lebanon looking to Damascus,
Song of Solomon 7 5
Your head on you is like Carmel, The hair of your head like purple; The king is held captive
in its tresses.
Thy head upon thee is like Carmel, And the locks of thy head like purple; The king is
fettered by [thy] ringlets!
Thy head upon thee as Carmel, And the locks of thy head as purple, The king is
bound with the flowings!
Song of Solomon 7 6
How beautiful and how pleasant are you, Love, for delights!
How fair and how pleasant art thou, [my] love, in delights!
How fair and how pleasant hast thou been, O love, in delights.
Song of Solomon 7 7
This, your stature, is like a palm tree, Your breasts like its fruit.
This thy stature is like to a palm-tree, And thy breasts to grape clusters.
This thy stature hath been like to a palm, And thy breasts to clusters.
Song of Solomon 7 8
I said, "I will climb up into the palm-tree. I will take hold of its fruit." Let your breasts be like clusters of the vine, The smell of your breath like apples, Beloved
I said, I will go up to the palm-tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof; And thy breasts
shall indeed be like clusters of the vine, And the fragrance of thy nose like apples,
I said, `Let me go up on the palm, Let me lay hold on its boughs, Yea, let thy breasts
be, I pray thee, as clusters of the vine, And the fragrance of thy face as citrons,
Song of Solomon 7 9
Your mouth like the best wine, That goes down smoothly for my beloved, Gliding through the lips of those who are asleep.
And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine, ... That goeth down smoothly for my beloved,
And stealeth over the lips of them that are asleep.
And thy palate as the good wine --` Flowing to my beloved in uprightness,
Strengthening the lips of the aged!
Song of Solomon 7 10
I am my beloved`s. His desire is toward me.
I am my beloved`s, And his desire is toward me.
I [am] my beloved`s, and on me [is] his desire.
Song of Solomon 7 11
Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field. Let us lodge in the villages.
-- Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the fields; Let us lodge in the villages.
Come, my beloved, we go forth to the field,
Song of Solomon 7 12
Let`s go early up to the vineyards. Let`s see whether the vine has budded, Its blossom is open, And the pomegranates are in flower. There I will give you my love.
We will go up early to the vineyards, We will see if the vine hath budded, [If] the blossom
is opening, And the pomegranates are in bloom: There will I give thee my loves.
We lodge in the villages, we go early to the vineyards, We see if the vine hath
flourished, The sweet smelling-flower hath opened. The pomegranates have
blossomed, There do I give to thee my loves;
Song of Solomon 7 13
The mandrakes give forth fragrance. At our doors are all kinds of precious fruits, new and old, Which I have stored up for you, my beloved.
The mandrakes yield fragrance; And at our gates are all choice fruits, new and old: I have
laid them up for thee, my beloved.
The mandrakes have given fragrance, And at our openings all pleasant things,
New, yea, old, my beloved, I laid up for thee!
Song of Solomon 8 1
Oh that you were like my brother, Who sucked the breasts of my mother! If I found you outside, I would kiss you; Yes, and no one would despise me.
Oh that thou wert as my brother, That sucked the breasts of my mother! Should I find
thee without, I would kiss thee; And they would not despise me.
Who doth make thee as a brother to me, Sucking the breasts of my mother? I find
thee without, I kiss thee, Yea, they do not despise me,
Song of Solomon 8 2
I would lead you, bringing you into my mother`s house, Who would instruct me. I would have you drink spiced wine, Of the juice of my pomegranate.
I would lead thee, bring thee into my mother`s house; Thou wouldest instruct me: I would
cause thee to drink of spiced wine, Of the juice of my pomegranate.
I lead thee, I bring thee in unto my mother`s house, She doth teach me, I cause
thee to drink of the perfumed wine, Of the juice of my pomegranate,
Song of Solomon 8 3
His left hand would be under my head. His right hand would embrace me.
His left hand would be under my head, And his right hand embrace me.
His left hand [is] under my head, And his right doth embrace me.
Song of Solomon 8 4
I adjure you, daughters of Jerusalem, That you not stir up, nor awaken love, Until it so
desires. Friends
I charge you, daughters of Jerusalem, ... Why should ye stir up, why awake [my] love, till
he please?
I have adjured you, daughters of Jerusalem, How ye stir up, And how ye wake the
love till she please!
Song of Solomon 8 5
Who is this who comes up from the wilderness, Leaning on her beloved? Under the apple tree I aroused you. There your mother conceived you. There she was in labor and bore you.
Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, Leaning upon her beloved? I awoke thee
under the apple-tree: There thy mother brought thee forth; There she brought thee forth
[that] bore thee.
Who [is] this coming from the wilderness, Hasting herself for her beloved? Under
the citron-tree I have waked thee, There did thy mother pledge thee, There she
gave a pledge [that] bare thee.
Song of Solomon 8 6
Set me as a seal on your heart, As a seal on your arm; For love is strong as death. Jealousy is
as cruel as Sheol; Its flashes are flashes of fire, A very flame of Yahweh.
Set me as a seal upon thy heart, As a seal upon thine arm: For love is strong as death;
Jealousy is cruel as Sheol: The flashes thereof are flashes of fire, Flames of Jah.
Set me as a seal on thy heart, as a seal on thine arm, For strong as death is love,
Sharp as Sheol is jealousy, Its burnings [are] burnings of fire, a flame of Jah!
Song of Solomon 8 7
Many waters can`t quench love, Neither can floods drown it. If a man would give all the wealth of his house for love, He would be utterly scorned. Friends
Many waters cannot quench love, Neither do the floods drown it: Even if a man gave all
the substance of his house for love, It would utterly be contemned.
Many waters are not able to quench the love, And floods do not wash it away. If one
give all the wealth of his house for love, Treading down -- they tread upon it.
Song of Solomon 8 8
We have a little sister. She has no breasts. What shall we do for our sister In the day when she is to be spoken for?
We have a little sister, And she hath no breasts: What shall we do for our sister In the day
when she shall be spoken for? --
We have a little sister, and breasts she hath not, What do we do for our sister, In
the day that it is told of her?
Song of Solomon 8 9
If she is a wall, We will build on her a turret of silver. If she is a door, We will enclose her
with boards of cedar. Beloved
If she be a wall, We will build upon her a turret of silver; And if she be a door, We will
enclose her with boards of cedar.
If she is a wall, we build by her a palace of silver. And if she is a door, We fashion
by her board-work of cedar.
Song of Solomon 8 10
I am a wall, and my breasts like towers, Then I was in his eyes like one who found peace.
I am a wall, and my breasts like towers; Then was I in his eyes as one that findeth peace.
I [am] a wall, and my breasts as towers, Then I have been in his eyes as one finding peace.
Song of Solomon 8 11
Solomon had a vineyard at Baal-hamon. He leased out the vineyard to keepers. Each was to
bring a thousand shekels of silver for its fruit.
Solomon had a vineyard at Baal-hamon: He let out the vineyard unto keepers; Every one
for the fruit thereof was to bring a thousand silver-pieces.
Solomon hath a vineyard in Baal-Hamon, He hath given the vineyard to keepers,
Each bringeth for its fruit a thousand silverlings;
Song of Solomon 8 12
My own vineyard is before me. The thousand are for you, Solomon; Two hundred for those who tend its fruit. Lover
My vineyard, which is mine, is before me: The thousand [silver-pieces] be to thee,
Solomon; And to the keepers of its fruit, two hundred.
My vineyard -- my own -- is before me, The thousand [is] for thee, O Solomon. And
the two hundred for those keeping its fruit. O dweller in gardens!
Song of Solomon 8 13
You who dwell in the gardens, with friends in attendance, Let me hear your voice! Beloved
Thou that dwellest in the gardens, The companions hearken to thy voice: Let me hear [it].
The companions are attending to thy voice, Cause me to hear. Flee, my beloved,
and be like to a roe,
Song of Solomon 8 14
Come away, my beloved! Be like a gazelle or a young stag on the mountains of spices!
Haste, my beloved, And be thou like a gazelle or a young hart Upon the mountains of spices.
Or to a young one of the harts on mountains of spices!
Study Questions 

Who did Solomon want to return? 6:13      Jealousy is _________________________? 8:6 
The World English Bible
Oct. 26
1 Thessalonians 3

1Th 3:1 Therefore, when we couldn't stand it any longer, we thought it good to be left behind at Athens alone,
1Th 3:2 and sent Timothy, our brother and God's servant in the Good News of Christ, to establish you, and to comfort you concerning your faith;
1Th 3:3 that no one be moved by these afflictions. For you know that we are appointed to this task.
1Th 3:4 For most certainly, when we were with you, we told you beforehand that we are to suffer affliction, even as it happened, and you know.
1Th 3:5 For this cause I also, when I couldn't stand it any longer, sent that I might know your faith, for fear that by any means the tempter had tempted you, and our labor would have been in vain.
1Th 3:6 But when Timothy came just now to us from you, and brought us glad news of your faith and love, and that you have good memories of us always, longing to see us, even as we also long to see you;
1Th 3:7 for this cause, brothers, we were comforted over you in all our distress and affliction through your faith.
1Th 3:8 For now we live, if you stand fast in the Lord.
1Th 3:9 For what thanksgiving can we render again to God for you, for all the joy with which we rejoice for your sakes before our God;
1Th 3:10 night and day praying exceedingly that we may see your face, and may perfect that which is lacking in your faith?
1Th 3:11 Now may our God and Father himself, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way to you;
1Th 3:12 and the Lord make you to increase and abound in love one toward another, and toward all men, even as we also do toward you,
1Th 3:13 to the end he may establish your hearts blameless in holiness before our God and Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his saints.
 
The Composite Bible
The World English Bible
Darby's Translation
Young's Literal Translation

The Composite Bible is a effort to understand the Bible by considering it from different perspectives and different levels of literalcy. First, read the World English Bible (the least literal-black text) for comprehension of the text. Next, read both the World English Bible with the Darby Translation (more literal-blue text)to make comparisons and lastly, read all three versions (Young's is the most literal translation- red text) at one time to obtain an overview of the text. Doing this will make you think about what the Scriptures are actually saying and avoid reading in a superficial manner.
1 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 3 1
Therefore, when we couldn`t stand it any longer, we thought it good to be left behind at Athens alone,
Wherefore, being no longer able to refrain ourselves, we thought good to be left alone in
Athens,
Wherefore no longer forbearing, we thought good to be left in Athens alone,
1 Thessalonians 3 2
and sent Timothy, our brother and God`s servant in the gospel of Christ, to establish you, and to comfort you concerning your faith;
and sent Timotheus, our brother and fellow-workman under God in the glad tidings of
Christ, to confirm you and encourage [you] concerning your faith,
and did send Timotheus -- our brother, and a ministrant of God, and our fellow-
workman in the good news of the Christ -- to establish you, and to comfort you
concerning your faith,
1 Thessalonians 3 3
that no one be moved by these afflictions. For you know that we are appointed to this task.
that no one might be moved by these afflictions. (For yourselves know that we are set for this;
that no one be moved in these tribulations, for yourselves have known that for this we are set,
1 Thessalonians 3 4
For most assuredly, when we were with you, we told you beforehand that we are to suffer
affliction, even as it happened, and you know.
for also, when we were with you, we told you beforehand we are about to be in
tribulation, even as also it came to pass, and ye know.)
for even when we were with you, we said to you beforehand, that we are about to
suffer tribulation, as also it did come to pass, and ye have known [it];
1 Thessalonians 3 5
For this cause I also, when I couldn`t stand it any longer, sent that I might know your faith, for fear that by any means the tempter had tempted you, and our labor would have been in vain.
For this reason *I* also, no longer able to refrain myself, sent to know your faith, lest
perhaps the tempter had tempted you and our labour should be come to nothing.
because of this also, I, no longer forbearing, did send to know your faith, lest he
who is tempting did tempt you, and in vain might be our labour.
1 Thessalonians 3 6
But when Timothy came just now to us from you, and brought us glad news of your faith and love, and that you have good memories of us always, longing to see us, even as we also long to see you;
But Timotheus having just come to us from you, and brought to us the glad tidings of
your faith and love, and that ye have always good remembrance of us, desiring much to
see us, even as we also you;
And now Timotheus having come unto us from you, and having declared good
news to us of your faith and love, and that ye have a good remembrance of us
always, desiring much to see us, as we also [to see] you,
1 Thessalonians 3 7
for this cause, brothers, we were comforted over you in all our distress and affliction through your faith.
for this reason we have been comforted in you, brethren, in all our distress and
tribulation, through your faith,
because of this we were comforted, brethren, over you, in all our tribulation and
necessity, through your faith,
1 Thessalonians 3 8
For now we live, if you stand fast in the Lord.
because now we live if *ye* stand firm in [the] Lord.
because now we live, if ye may stand fast in the Lord;
1 Thessalonians 3 9
For what thanksgiving can we render again to God for you, for all the joy with which we rejoice for your sakes before our God;
For what thanksgiving can we render to God for you, for all the joy wherewith we rejoice
on account of you before our God,
for what thanks are we able to recompense to God for you, for all the joy with
which we do joy because of you in the presence of our God?
1 Thessalonians 3 10
night and day praying exceedingly that we may see your face, and may perfect that which is lacking in your faith?
night and day beseeching exceedingly to the end that we may see your face, and perfect
what is lacking in your faith?
night and day exceedingly beseeching, that we might see your face, and perfect
the things lacking in your faith.
1 Thessalonians 3 11
Now may our God and Father himself, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way to you;
But our God and Father himself, and our Lord Jesus, direct our way to you.
And our God and Father Himself, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way unto you,
1 Thessalonians 3 12
and the Lord make you to increase and abound in love one toward another, and toward all men, even as we also do toward you,
But you, may the Lord make to exceed and abound in love toward one another, and toward
all, even as we also towards you,
and you the Lord cause to increase and to abound in the love to one another, and to
all, even as we also to you,
1 Thessalonians 3 13
to the end he may establish your hearts blameless in holiness before our God and Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his saints.
in order to the confirming of your hearts unblamable in holiness before our God and
Father at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his saints.
to the establishing your hearts blameless in sanctification before our God and
Father, in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ with all His saints.


 Study Questions

What should they overflow (abound) in? 3:12