6/18/14

From Jim McGuiggan... Pigs and ancient magic

Pigs and ancient magic

The Greek poet Homer tells us that Aeetes, the baleful king of Colchis, had a sister called Circe, a godess who had no love for humans. She had a palace on the island of Dawn in the middle of a forest and when some of Odysseus' crew investigated the island they heard her playing the harp and looked in on her. She smiled, invited them in, fed them poisoned food and turned them into grunting, feverish swine.

Silly old story. One gentleman said, "I didn't believe it of course until one evening when I was passing a group of young men on a street corner. I heard enough of the lascivious story being told, and I saw the leers, the flushed faces, the glistening eyes and the muttered wickedness and I knew I had wandered into the garden of Circe. The spell was working before my very eyes. These humans were turning into swine."

And so it is, feeding on what has been poisoned, we surrender to a spell that cheapens and coarsens us, making mere animals of us in our passions and the way we indulge them. We need somebody wise enough and strong enough and "ruthless" enough to deliver us from the curse because in our sinfully weakened state and in a society like ours we aren't able to do it alone.

It didn't matter to Circe that the humans were turned into animals that roamed her forest or into pigs to be herded into sties but it matters to the Holy Spirit who works to make us holy because he cannot bear to see us continue in our shame. Those who don't care for us will shrug at our dishonour or give up on us before very long, especially if their wisdom isn't quickly recognized or heeded.

Hosea speaks more tenderly of the love of God than any other prophet but he also speaks more trenchantly against sin than any other. Israel is in headlong flight away from God, going deeper and deeper into swinish ways and yet God, the Holy Father says, "How can I give you up, Israel? How can I abandon you?" (11:8) Even for those of us who presently don't care that we bury our snouts in swill and muck, who are content to be humans with piggish ways, there's the possibility of full reclamation because God not only doesn't want us to perish he wants us to be made whole (see 2 Peter 3:9 and 1 Thessalonians 4:3-8). He gives us the assurance that he will do just that if we will let him (1 Thessalonians 5:23-24).

But what if we're afraid that we don't want to let him? Do we want to want to let him? Then by his grace we should do what we're able to do and trust him for the rest. Sin and its power is a great mystery but as C.S. Lewis has taught us, there is a deeper ancient magic at work in the cross of Christ. Odysseus cured his men with the fabled white flower of Hermes and God cures people with the life and redeeming sacrifice of his Son and he becomes not only our righteousness, and wisdom but our holiness (1 Corinthians 1:30).

©2004 Jim McGuiggan. All materials are free to be copied and used as long as money is not being made.

Many thanks to brother Ed Healy, for allowing me to post from his website, theabidingword.com.

From Jeff Miller, Ph.D. ... Science: Instituted by God





http://apologeticspress.org/APContent.aspx?category=12&article=4213

Science: Instituted by God

by  Jeff Miller, Ph.D.

Some contend that science is at odds with religion. They suggest that the scientific method requires empirical testing, but God’s existence cannot be empirically verified. Science supposedly proves the Big Bang, evolutionary theory, a very old Universe, and dinosaurs that never co-existed with humans, while the Bible mistakenly contends that the Universe was created in six literal, 24-hour days only a few thousand years ago, with humans and dinosaurs being created together on day six. Supposedly, science is based on verifiable evidence, whereas religion is based on “blind faith” and ambiguous “tinglies” attributed to the Holy Spirit. For such reasons, it is claimed that science and Scripture cannot be harmonized—that they are diametrically opposed to each another.
In reality, however, true science agrees perfectly with Scripture. Though God’s existence cannot be empirically verified, it can be easily verified through deductive reasoning from the scientific evidence available to us—in the same way forensic scientists use science to investigate events that they did not personally witness. While atheists have successfully created the mirage that science supports their theories, abundant scientific evidence exists which disproves the Big Bang Theory, evolutionary theory, an old Universe, and proves that dinosaurs and humans co-existed (see www.apologeticspress.org for more information on these matters). And yet, no scientific evidence exists that contradicts the true creation model. Rather, the evidence always supports it. The concept of “blind faith,” though championed by many who call themselves Christians, is at odds with Scripture, which defines faith as choosing to believe in something, based on the evidence that has been presented for it, and responding accordingly (see Miller, 2003). Atheistic scientists are simply wrong in their sweeping accusation that science and religion are at odds.
Though some theistic beliefs contradict science, when handled accurately (2 Timothy 2:15), Scripture and science compliment each other perfectly. For instance, science has shown us that matter is not eternal, according to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and could not have spontaneously generated—popping into existence from nothing—according to the First Law of Thermodynamics. This fact indicates that matter must have been placed here by an Entity outside the physical Universe (see Miller, 2007). This truth, arrived at through science and deductive reasoning, is not in harmony with atheism and much of today’s pseudo-science. But this truth is in keeping with the Bible, which says in its very first verse that God—a Being not subject to the laws of nature (i.e., a supernatural Being)—created the heavens and the Earth. Science supports Scripture.
Science has shown us that in nature, life comes only from life and that of its kind, according to the Law of Biogenesis. Again, this fact indicates that a Being outside of nature must exist Who initiated life (see Miller, 2012). This truth, arrived at through science and deductive reasoning, is not in harmony with atheism and much of today’s pseudoscientific world which must contend, without scientific support, that life popped into existence from non-life. Rather, this truth is in keeping with the Bible, which says in Genesis 1:11,24 and 2:7 that God created life.
Science—the Law of Biogenesis and the Laws of Genetics—has shown us that living beings produce other living beings of their own kind (see Thompson, 2002). There may be small changes along the way (e.g., beak size, color, size, etc.), but the offspring of a bird is still a bird. The offspring of a fish is still a fish. Therefore, since there is no common ancestor for all living beings from which all species evolved, there must be a supernatural Being Who initially created various kinds of life on Earth. This truth, arrived at through science and deductive reasoning, is not in harmony with the teachings of atheism and much of today’s pseudo-scientific world, which argues against the evidence, that various kinds of living beings can give rise to completely different kinds of living beings. But this truth is in keeping with the Bible, which says in Genesis 1:21 and 1:24-25 that God directed living beings to reproduce after their kind.
True science is in harmony with true religion. Why would science lie? It does not have a mind of its own. It has no bias or agenda. It can certainly be misrepresented or its findings misinterpreted, but science is not the enemy of true religion. In fact, according to the Bible, God, Himself, instituted the field of science. When God created human beings on day six and told them to “have dominion” over the Earth and “subdue” it (Genesis 1:28), He was commanding mankind to do something that would require extensive scientific investigation and experimentation. If God founded science, why would science be at odds with religion? When God, through His servant Paul, said in Romans 1:20 that His existence and some of His attributes could be learned from His creation, He was putting His stamp of approval on the scientific study of creation. When He said in 1 Thessalonians 5:21 to “[t]est all things; hold fast what is good,” He was essentially summarizing the scientific method. Bottom line: God founded science. When legitimate scientific findings are interpreted properly and fairly, science supports the Bible and Christianity. It certainly is not at odds with the Bible.

REFERENCES

Miller, Dave (2003), “Blind Faith,” Apologetics Press, http://www.apologeticspress.org/article/444.
Miller, Jeff (2007), “God and the Laws of Thermodynamics: A Mechanical Engineer’s Perspective,” Reason & Revelation, 27[4]:25-31, April (Montgomery, AL: Apologetics Press), http://www.apologeticspress.org/articles/3293.
Miller, Jeff (2012), “The Law of Biogenesis,” Reason & Revelation, 32[1]:2-11, January (Montgomery, AL: Apologetics Press), http://www.apologeticspress.org/apPubPage.aspx?pub=1&issue=1018&article=1722.
Thompson, Bert (2002), The Scientific Case for Creation (Montgomery, AL: Apologetics Press).

From Mark Copeland... The Conversion Of Lydia (Acts 16:11-15)

                          "THE BOOK OF ACTS"

                  The Conversion Of Lydia (16:11-15)

INTRODUCTION

1. One of the best reasons to study Acts is to take note of the examples
   of conversion...
   a. In which the gospel was preached and people responded
   b. Noting what was preached, and how people responded

2. For today, many people in the name of Christianity...
   a. Preach a false gospel of Christ
   b. Or proclaim a false response to the gospel

[We have examined several conversions already in our study of Acts. Now 
we come to "The Conversion of Lydia", perhaps the first convert to Christ
in the continent of Europe...] 

I. OCCASIONED BY THE MACEDONIAN CALL

   A. PAUL'S VISION AT TROAS...
      1. He and his company had been making their way through Asia 
         (Turkey)
      2. The Spirit had limited their options - Ac 16:6-8
      3. In Troas Paul had a vision ("The Macedonian Call") - Ac 16:9
      4. Taking the vision as a call from the Lord, they depart for
         Macedonia - Ac 16:10

   B. PAUL'S ARRIVAL AT PHILIPPI...
      1. Sailing from Troas - Ac 16:11
         a. They sail to Samothrace, a small mountainous (5000+ ft.)
            island
         b. And then to Neopolis, seaport for the city of Philippi 
      2. Arriving at Philippi - Ac 16:12
         a. Foremost city of that part of Macedonia
         b. Made a Roman colony in 42 B.C.

[Arriving at Philippi, Paul and his companions (including Luke, note
"we") were staying in the city for several days (Ac 16:12).  On one of
those days, they went down to the river...]

II. THE BAPTISM OF LYDIA AND HER HOUSEHOLD

   A. AT THE RIVERSIDE FOR PRAYER...
      1. Paul and his company go down to the riverside on the Sabbath
         - Ac 16:13
      2. Paul's custom was to find a synagogue on the Sabbath - Ac 17:1-3
         a. To reason with Jews about Christ        
         b. Evidently there were not many Jews in Philippi, and no
            synagogue
         c. According to Jewish custom, at least 10 male Jews were
            required for a synagogue
      3. But women met at the river to pray, and Paul's company speaks to
         them

   B. LYDIA HEEDS THE WORD OF GOD...
      1. Lydia was a successful business woman - Ac 16:14
         a. A seller of purple (goods, dye), suggesting wealth on her
            part
         b. From Thyatira, a city of Asia (Turkey) known for its
            expensive purple dyes
      2. Lydia was a religious woman - Ac 16:14
         a. One who worshipped God
         b. Her name is Greek, so perhaps a convert to Judaism 
      3. She heard Paul, and the Lord opened her heart to heed what he 
         said - Ac 16:14
         a. In what way the Lord opened her heart is not stated
         b. But she "heard" what Paul was speaking - Ac 16:13,14
         c. We know that "faith comes by hearing the word of God" - Ro 10:17
      4. Through the gospel, one's heart can be opened to be receptive
         a. For the gospel is God's power to save - Ro 1:16
         b. It tells of God's goodness, that should lead one to repent 
            - Ro 2:4
      5. Lydia was willing "to heed the things spoken by Paul" - Ac 16:14-15
         a. I.e., to do or obey whatever Paul had said
         b. We can infer that it included baptism - cf. Mk 16:15-16; Ac 2:38
         c. For she and her household (family, servants) were baptized 
            - cf. Ac 8:12,35-38

[At this point, allow me to make some...]

III. OBSERVATIONS RELATED TO LYDIA'S CONVERSION

   A. RELIGIOUS PEOPLE NEED SAVING...
      1. Throughout Acts, the gospel was proclaimed to religious people
         a. The thousands of devout Jews in Jerusalem on Pentecost - Ac 2:1-41
         b. The many Jews gathered on Solomon's Porch at the temple - Ac  3:1-26
         c. The Ethiopian eunuch who had travelled to Jerusalem to 
            worship - Ac 8:26-40
         d. Saul of Tarsus, a devout Jewish rabbi - Ac 9:1-19; 22:1-16;
            26:1-13
         e. Cornelius, a devout Gentile who feared God, prayed always
            - Ac 10:1-48
      2. Without Jesus, religious people are lost!
         a. He is the way, the truth, the life; there is no way to God 
            but through Him - Jn 14:16
         b. There is no other name but Jesus whereby one can be saved
            - Ac 4:12
         c. He is the only Mediator between God and man - 1Ti 2:5-6
      -- It is not enough to be religious; we need Jesus Christ as our 
         Savior!

   B. THE LOGICAL CONCLUSION TO GOSPEL PREACHING...
      1. In every case of conversion described in Acts with detail,
         baptism occurs quickly
      2. In most cases, after hearing just one lesson about Christ! 
         - e.g., Ac 8:35-38
      3. Referring to Peter's sermon on Pentecost, a respected Baptist 
         scholar wrote:  "Baptism is here a part of the proclamation of 
         Christ. In an Apostolic sermon it comes as its logical 
         conclusion.  An effort ought to be made to restore this note in
         our [Baptist] preaching." - Baptism In The New Testament, George
         Beasley-Murray, p. 393
      -- Indeed, the command of baptism needs to be restored to all
         gospel preaching!

   C. AN INDICATION OF FAITHFULNESS...
      1. In asking Paul and his companions to stay with her, Lydia asks 
         "If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord..." - Ac 16:15
      2. What evidence was there to determine whether she was faithful?
      3. At the very least, her willingness to be baptized! - Ac 16:15
      -- Would not refusal to be baptized indicate a lack of 
         faithfulness?

   D. THE ISSUE OF INFANT BAPTISM...
      1. Some appeal to "household conversions" as evidence of infant
         baptism, such as:
         a. The conversion of Cornelius and his household - Ac 10:1-48
         b. The conversion of Lydia and her household - Ac 16:11-15
         c. The conversion of the Philippian jailor and his household
            - Ac 16:25-34
      2. The argument is that we may assume infants were present, but is
         that the case here?
         a. Lydia was a businesswoman, with no mention of a husband 
         b. She was from Thyatira, possibly in Philippi on business
            (though she did have a home)
         c. We can just as easily assume that her household was made up
            of servants, or at least children old enough to travel
      -- The burden of proof rests upon those seeking to support infant
         baptism, and the evidence in this case simply isn't there (nor
         elsewhere)

CONCLUSION

1. With the conversion of Lydia, we have...
   a. Perhaps the first gospel convert in the continent of Europe
   b. The beginning of the church at Philippi, which may have met in her
      home - cf. Ac 16:40

2. We also have an example of the Providence of God...
   a. Leading servants who are prepared to teach, to seekers who are
      praying
   b. As in the case of Cornelius, and the Ethiopian treasurer

3. Fulfilling the words of Jesus:  
   a. "Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for
      they shall be filled." - Mt 5:6
   b. "Seek and you will find" - Mt 7:7-8

Such individuals are like the man in The Parable of the Pearl of Great
Price:

   "Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant seeking beautiful
   pearls, who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and
   sold all that he had and bought it." - Mt 13:45-46

Lydia was a successful merchant, but she knew there was something much
more valuable than money.  Her worship and prayer gave her the
opportunity to hear the gospel, and she showed her faithfulness to God
by obeying the gospel immediately through faith and baptism (cf. Mk
16:15-16).  

How about you...?

Executable Outlines, Copyright © Mark A. Copeland, 2013

From Gary... Bible Reading June 18


Bible Reading  

June 18

The World English Bible



June 18
1 Samuel 29, 30

1Sa 29:1 Now the Philistines gathered together all their armies to Aphek: and the Israelites encamped by the spring which is in Jezreel.
1Sa 29:2 The lords of the Philistines passed on by hundreds, and by thousands; and David and his men passed on in the rearward with Achish.
1Sa 29:3 Then said the princes of the Philistines, What do these Hebrews here? Achish said to the princes of the Philistines, Isn't this David, the servant of Saul the king of Israel, who has been with me these days, or rather these years, and I have found no fault in him since he fell away to me to this day?
1Sa 29:4 But the princes of the Philistines were angry with him; and the princes of the Philistines said to him, Make the man return, that he may go back to his place where you have appointed him, and let him not go down with us to battle, lest in the battle he become an adversary to us: for with what should this fellow reconcile himself to his lord? should it not be with the heads of these men?
1Sa 29:5 Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying, Saul has slain his thousands, David his ten thousands?
1Sa 29:6 Then Achish called David, and said to him, As Yahweh lives, you have been upright, and your going out and your coming in with me in the army is good in my sight; for I have not found evil in you since the day of your coming to me to this day: nevertheless the lords don't favor you.
1Sa 29:7 Therefore now return, and go in peace, that you not displease the lords of the Philistines.
1Sa 29:8 David said to Achish, But what have I done? and what have you found in your servant so long as I have been before you to this day, that I may not go and fight against the enemies of my lord the king?
1Sa 29:9 Achish answered David, I know that you are good in my sight, as an angel of God: notwithstanding the princes of the Philistines have said, He shall not go up with us to the battle.
1Sa 29:10 Therefore now rise up early in the morning with the servants of your lord who have come with you; and as soon as you are up early in the morning, and have light, depart.
1Sa 29:11 So David rose up early, he and his men, to depart in the morning, to return into the land of the Philistines. The Philistines went up to Jezreel.
1Sa 30:1 It happened, when David and his men were come to Ziklag on the third day, that the Amalekites had made a raid on the South, and on Ziklag, and had struck Ziklag, and burned it with fire,
1Sa 30:2 and had taken captive the women and all who were therein, both small and great: they didn't kill any, but carried them off, and went their way.
1Sa 30:3 When David and his men came to the city, behold, it was burned with fire; and their wives, and their sons, and their daughters, were taken captive.
1Sa 30:4 Then David and the people who were with him lifted up their voice and wept, until they had no more power to weep.
1Sa 30:5 David's two wives were taken captive, Ahinoam the Jezreelitess, and Abigail the wife of Nabal the Carmelite.
1Sa 30:6 David was greatly distressed; for the people spoke of stoning him, because the soul of all the people was grieved, every man for his sons and for his daughters: but David strengthened himself in Yahweh his God.
1Sa 30:7 David said to Abiathar the priest, the son of Ahimelech, Please bring me here the ephod. Abiathar brought there the ephod to David.
1Sa 30:8 David inquired of Yahweh, saying, If I pursue after this troop, shall I overtake them? He answered him, Pursue; for you shall surely overtake them, and shall without fail recover all.
1Sa 30:9 So David went, he and the six hundred men who were with him, and came to the brook Besor, where those who were left behind stayed.
1Sa 30:10 But David pursued, he and four hundred men; for two hundred stayed behind, who were so faint that they couldn't go over the brook Besor.
1Sa 30:11 They found an Egyptian in the field, and brought him to David, and gave him bread, and he ate; and they gave him water to drink.
1Sa 30:12 They gave him a piece of a cake of figs, and two clusters of raisins: and when he had eaten, his spirit came again to him; for he had eaten no bread, nor drunk any water, three days and three nights.
1Sa 30:13 David said to him, To whom do you belong? and where are you from? He said, I am a young man of Egypt, servant to an Amalekite; and my master left me, because three days ago I fell sick.
1Sa 30:14 We made a raid on the South of the Cherethites, and on that which belongs to Judah, and on the South of Caleb; and we burned Ziklag with fire.
1Sa 30:15 David said to him, Will you bring me down to this troop? He said, Swear to me by God, that you will neither kill me, nor deliver me up into the hands of my master, and I will bring you down to this troop.
1Sa 30:16 When he had brought him down, behold, they were spread abroad over all the ground, eating and drinking, and dancing, because of all the great spoil that they had taken out of the land of the Philistines, and out of the land of Judah.
1Sa 30:17 David struck them from the twilight even to the evening of the next day: and there not a man of them escaped, except four hundred young men, who rode on camels and fled.
1Sa 30:18 David recovered all that the Amalekites had taken; and David rescued his two wives.
1Sa 30:19 There was nothing lacking to them, neither small nor great, neither sons nor daughters, neither spoil, nor anything that they had taken to them: David brought back all.
1Sa 30:20 David took all the flocks and the herds, which they drove before those other livestock, and said, This is David's spoil.
1Sa 30:21 David came to the two hundred men, who were so faint that they could not follow David, whom also they had made to abide at the brook Besor; and they went forth to meet David, and to meet the people who were with him: and when David came near to the people, he greeted them.
1Sa 30:22 Then answered all the wicked men and base fellows, of those who went with David, and said, Because they didn't go with us, we will not give them anything of the spoil that we have recovered, except to every man his wife and his children, that he may lead them away, and depart.
1Sa 30:23 Then said David, You shall not do so, my brothers, with that which Yahweh has given to us, who has preserved us, and delivered the troop that came against us into our hand.
1Sa 30:24 Who will listen to you in this matter? for as his share is who goes down to the battle, so shall his share be who tarries by the baggage: they shall share alike.
1Sa 30:25 It was so from that day forward, that he made it a statute and an ordinance for Israel to this day.
1Sa 30:26 When David came to Ziklag, he sent of the spoil to the elders of Judah, even to his friends, saying, Behold, a present for you of the spoil of the enemies of Yahweh:
1Sa 30:27 To those who were in Bethel, and to those who were in Ramoth of the South, and to those who were in Jattir,
1Sa 30:28 and to those who were in Aroer, and to those who were in Siphmoth, and to those who were in Eshtemoa,
1Sa 30:29 and to those who were in Racal, and to those who were in the cities of the Jerahmeelites, and to those who were in the cities of the Kenites,
1Sa 30:30 and to those who were in Hormah, and to those who were in Borashan, and to those who were in Athach,
1Sa 30:31 and to those who were in Hebron, and to all the places where David himself and his men used to stay.

From Gary... To be a thinker



Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf

http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker

The other day, I did something I don't normally do; that is, I followed one of those analysis links found on the net Career analysis.  Since my my good friend, Eric Cantin was its source, I assumed it to be legit.  I was pleasantly surprised to see that it suggested Philosopher for me.  Then, I looked for a picture showing someone thinking and was surprised by what I found.  I won't tell you what the surprise was- you will need to follow the link under the picture for yourself, but after thinking about it a bit, I think the following passage of Scripture is appropriate...

1 Corinthians, Chapter 1
1Co 1:18  For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.
1Co 1:19  For it is written, "I WILL DESTROY THE WISDOM OF THE WISE, AND THE CLEVERNESS OF THE CLEVER I WILL SET ASIDE."
1Co 1:20  Where is the wise man? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?
1Co 1:21  For since in the wisdom of God the world through its wisdom did not come to know God, God was well-pleased through the foolishness of the message preached to save those who believe.
1Co 1:22  For indeed Jews ask for signs and Greeks search for wisdom;
1Co 1:23  but we preach Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block and to Gentiles foolishness,

1Co 1:24  but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.
1Co 1:25  Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness of God is stronger than men.
1Co 1:26  For consider your calling, brethren, that there were not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble;
1Co 1:27  but God has chosen the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to shame the things which are strong,
1Co 1:28  and the base things of the world and the despised God has chosen, the things that are not, so that He may nullify the things that are,
1Co 1:29  so that no man may boast before God.
1Co 1:30  But by His doing you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification, and redemption,
1Co 1:31  so that, just as it is written, "LET HIM WHO BOASTS, BOAST IN THE LORD."

Frankly, I would have never chosen the occupation of Philosopher because it doesn't pay enough to support a wife and children, but if money were no object- Philosophy might have been a good choice.  But, what to consider, that is the rub!!!  For me, this passage from Corinthians says it all!!!  To know God, his son Jesus and the truth sent from HEAVEN- now THAT IS SOMETHING WORTH THINKING ABOUT!!!!

PS..  Now would be a good time to view the "thinker" link!!!!

Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf

Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf

Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf
 

Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf
 

Auguste Rodin (1840 -1917)

The Thinker

Monumental
1903
青铜
H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
S.2838
When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanumThe Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of HellThe Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
- See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.3ysFyHMc.dpuf